choice

A Quote by Francis Harry Compton Crick on ability, age, careers, certainty, change, choice, difficulty, effort, enthusiasm, expertise, good, investment, knowledge, mathematics, physics, radicals, scientists, time, and war

When the war finally came to an end, I was at a loss as to what to do. . . . I took stock of my qualifications. A not-very-good degree, redeemed somewhat by my achievements at the Admiralty. A knowledge of certain restricted parts of magnetism and hydrodynamics, neither of them subjects for which I felt the least bit of enthusiasm. No published papers at all. . . . Only gradually did I realize that this lack of qualification could be an advantage. By the time most scientists have reached age thirty they are trapped by their own expertise. They have invested so much effort in one particular field that it is often extremely difficult, at that time in their careers, to make a radical change. I, on the other hand, knew nothing, except for a basic training in somewhat old-fashioned physics and mathematics and an ability to turn my hand to new things. . . . Since I essentially knew nothing, I had an almost completely free choice. . . .

Francis Crick (1916 -)

Source: Francis Crick, What Mad Pursuit, Basic Books, New York, 1988, pp 15-16.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by F. Burton Howard on anger, apologies, automobiles, certainty, choice, christmas, cities, clarity, college, confusion, day, decisions, driving, family, fatherhood, good, history, home, jokes, journeys, kiss, laughter, life, losing, mountains, n

When I was in my first year of college at Logan, Utah, I bought an old car for a hundred dollars. I was eighteen and thought that I knew all about driving. It was Christmastime, and my parents were living on a ranch in Wyoming. I picked up my two grandmothers and took them to my parents' home for Christmas. We had a grand time there. When it was time to return to school, the weather had changed and the roads were treacherous. That morning as we were ready to leave, we held a family prayer in the living room. My father prayed that we would have a safe journey. After we had loaded my car with suitcases, blankets, tuna fish sandwiches, and a thermos bottle full of Postum, Dad walked out to the car and said, 'I want to talk to you.' We went over and stood by the fence. 'You have a very valuable cargo,' he said, nodding at my grandmothers. 'I want you to promise me that if the roads are bad and it's snowing when you get down to Lander, you won't go over South Pass. I want you to take the long way.' I promised him that I would. My parents kissed us good-bye, and we were on our way. We had nice weather until we got to Riverton; then it started to snow. By the time we got to Lander, it was snowing pretty hard. I remembered my promise, so when we came to the intersection where you turn to go up the mountain, I made a conscious turn to go the long way. I remember thinking then that it was going to take us five hours longer to get to Utah. I knew the road, and I was absolutely certain that I had made the right turn. As we drove along, we were joking and laughing, although the snow was getting thicker. Then I saw a sign that read, 'Historic Old South Pass City,' and I realized that I had somehow become confused in the snowstorm and had taken the wrong road! I thought, Dad will be angry with me! I don't know how this happened-it wasn't intentional. I had only two choices: I could keep on going, or I could turn around and go back. By this time, we were at the summit, so I decided that we might as well keep going and that I would apologize to Dad later. As we came down the mountain, the snow stopped and the roads were clear. We drove to Logan and then to Malad without any problems. On my way to school the next day I happened to see the front-page headline of a newspaper: WORST BLIZZARD OF THE YEAR STRANDS HUNDREDS IN CENTRAL WYOMING. I bought a paper, and it was full of stories about people who had been stranded, lost, or killed on the road that I had promised to take. I realized that the prayer our family had offered had been answered. I knew that the Lord had gotten us on the right road, and I realized how He had protected us. I was never the same after that.

F. Burton Howard (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Taft Benson on appreciation, blessings, choice, effort, good, hope, and spirit

Someone has said it is better to appreciate the things you don't own than to own things you don't appreciate. I hope we will have with us a spirit of appreciation for all of the good things we enjoy, all the blessings that we have, many of which have come so easy to us, with very little effort on our part, and yet they are very real and very choice and are truly rich blessings.

Ezra Taft Benson (1899 - 1994)

Source: "New Year 1961," Washington D.C. Ward, 31 December 1960.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Erich Fromm on choice, destruction, justice, life, love, and miracles

That man can destroy life is just as miraculous a feat as that he can create it, for life is the miracle, the inexplicable. In the act of destruction, man sets himself above life; he transcends himself as a creature. Thus, the ultimate choice for a man, inasmuch as he is driven to transcend himself, is to create or to destroy, to love or to hate.

Erich Fromm (1900 - 1980)

Source: The Sane Society

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Erica Jong on choice, earth, equality, home, learning, men, survival, women, and work

Women really must have equal pay for equal work, equality in work at home, and reproductive choices. Men must press for these things also. They must cease to see them as "women's issues" and learn that they are everyone's issues - essential to survival on planet Earth.

Erica Jong (1942 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric Lustbader on animals, change, choice, justice, kindness, men, mistakes, sex, stability, thinking, violence, and women

Men make the mistake of thinking that because women can't see the sense in violence, they must be passive creatures. It's just not true. In one important way, at least, men are the passive sex. Given a choice, they will always opt for the status quo. They hate change of any kind, and they fight against it constantly. On the other hand, what women want is stability, which when you stop to think about it is a very different animal.

Eric Lustbader

Source: The Kaisho

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Epictetus on acting, business, character, choice, and play

Remember that you are an actor in a play, and that the Playwright chooses the manner of it: If he wants you to act a poor man you must act the part with all your powers; and so if your part be a cripple or a magistrate or a plain man. For your business is to act the character that is given you and act it well. The choice of the cast is Another's.

Epictetus (c. 50 - 120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Enders M. Voorhees on america, choice, men, occupations, opportunity, people, and skill

America is the land of, and for, uncommon men not because it affords free choice and opportunity for people to become expert in their chosen occupations, but also because it has mechanisms and incentives for providing the tools of production that the skilled must operate if their skill is to have full fruition in abundant production.

Enders M. Voorhees

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine L. Jack on beginning, choice, circumstances, effort, exercise, faith, happiness, hope, investment, life, meaning, prayer, and seasons

Testimony is a result of choice, not circumstance. In all seasons of my life, testimony has been a conscious choice - and this choice has given everything else in my life meaning. Building a testimony is the beginning of building a happy life. Testimony grows step by step as we invest the effort to exercise faith and hope as active parts of everyday living. Prayer is a major tool to help us gain faith and hope.

Elaine L. Jack

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on choice, darkness, earth, garden, imagination, immortality, life, loneliness, motherhood, posterity, promises, soul, water, wilderness, and women

EDEN We had no childhood, Eve and I. Eden was our mother's breast. Our lullaby was earth's first whimperings as grass and herb bloomed seasonless. I named them blade, by stem, by stalk in loneliness, before the Gods formed woman from my rib of dust. The garden was our womb: to nurture flesh, acknowledge bone, mold our souls in clay. We found our eyes, we heard our mouths, we filled each nostril full of sky, fingers tasted water, hands touched naked skin, bare as the fish in the four rivers, smooth as the serpent, who walked on subtle feet beneath the one tree, given and forbidden. We were pretenders, Eve and I, beneath its leaves of black and white. We played at being Gods below its fruit-filled limbs, imagined our posterity, and in the shade of its dark promise, we dreamed of immortality. Eden was our childhood, lived before the wilderness, before the curse, before Cherubim. And the Gods knew it was a garden like everyman's filled with only one choice.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: At the Edges, published by the Utah State Poetry Society, 1990

Contributed by: Zaady

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