charm

A Quote by Ashleigh Brilliant on charm, college, diversity, good, insanity, literature, psychology, time, and work

Of Ashleigh Brilliant's work: "Endlessly quotable . . . they draw one by the charm of their diversity of texture and taste." - Eric Korn, The (London) Times Literary Supplement "Outstandingly good. I've been a fan for years." - Herb Caen, San Francisco Chronicle "I really like the things Ashleigh Brilliant thinks of. The only time he makes me mad is when he thinks of things before I do." - Charles M. Schulz, creator of Peanuts. "Wonderfully inspirational and insane messages." - Professor J. Katz, Dept. of Psychology, John Abbott College, Canada.

Ashleigh Brilliant (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Symons on charm and literature

Without charm there can be no fine literature, as there can be no perfect flower with-out fragrance.

Arthur Symons (1865 - 1945)

Source: The Symbolist Movement in Literature, 1899, Stéphane Mallarmé

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Gordon on age, challenge, charm, day, enthusiasm, foolishness, life, love, nonsense, and sister

When we were growing up years ago in our sleepy Southern town, most of the adults seemed rather staid and sober. There was, however, one memorable exception: Miss Lucy, a widow lady who lived with her prim and proper sister, Clara. But Miss Lucy was full of charm and sparkle and enthusiasm. One day Miss Lucy-in her 60s asserted that she could still stand on her head. When we looked doubtful, she clamped her skirt between her knees and did so, beaming at us upside down. "Oh, Lucy," said Clara. "Do be your age!" Miss Lucy righted herself. "What sort of nonsense is that?" she asked. "How can anyone be anything but their age? The trick is to love your age. Love it when you're young and strong and foolish. Love it when you're old and wise. Love it in the middle when the challenges come and you can solve some of them, maybe most of them. If you love your age, you'll never go around wishing you were some other age. Think about that, Clara."

Arthur Gordon

Source: Return to Wonder (Broadman & Holman)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Archimedes on charm, day, discovery, losing, mind, and spirit

Spoken of the young Archimedes: . . . [he] was as much enchanted by the rudiments of algebra as he would have been if I had given him an engine worked by steam, with a methylated spirit lamp to heat the boiler; more enchanted, perhaps for the engine would have got broken, and, remaining always itself, would in any case have lost its charm, while the rudiments of algebra continued to grow and blossom in his mind with an unfailing luxuriance. Every day he made the discovery of something which seemed to him exquisitely beautiful; the new toy was inexhaustible in its potentialities.

Archimedes (c.. 287 - 212 BC)

Source: quoted by Aldous Huxley

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anita Brookner on charm

in

A man of such obvious and exemplary charm must be a liar.

Anita Brookner (1938 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on art, charm, nature, and realism

REALISM, n. The art of depicting nature as it is seem by toads. The charm suffusing a landscape painted by a mole, or a story written by a measuring-worm.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on charm, language, and music

LANGUAGE, n. The music with which we charm the serpents guarding another's treasure.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on beauty, charm, husbands, power, and women

BEAUTY, n. That power by which a woman charms a lover and terrifies a husband.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on art, awareness, charm, and modesty

Modesty, The gentle art of enhancing your charm by pretending not to be aware of it.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on charm, humor, husbands, and rules

She who ne'er answers till a husband cools, Or, if she rules him, never shows she rules; Charms by accepting, by submitting, sways, Yet has her humor most, when she obeys.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content