charm

A Quote by Ezra Pound on books, charm, civilization, earth, and good

There died a myriad, And of the best, among them, For an old bitch gone in the teeth, For a botched civilization. Charm, smiling at the good mouth, Quick eyes gone under earth's lid, For two gross of broken statues, For a few thousand battered books.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, V

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward King on beauty, charm, creation, influence, quality, and students

One of his students wrote afterwards of King's influence as follows: The whole place was alive with him. His look, his voice, his gaiety, his beauty, his charm, his holiness, filled it and possessed it. There was an air about it, a tone in it, a quality, a delicacy, a depth, which were his creation. . . . All was human, natural, and free.

Edward King (1829 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Albert Guest on beginning, charity, charm, children, conversation, day, death, duty, earth, faith, fame, fatherhood, god, gold, greatness, hope, joy, lies, life, love, men, purity, selfishness, sons, spirit, work, world, worship, and wor

We've never seen the father here, but we have known the son, The finest type of manhood since the world was first begun, And summing up the works of God, I write with reverent pen. The greatest is the son he sent to cheer the lives of men. Through him we leaned the ways of God, and found the father's love; The son it was who won us back to him who reigns above. Our God did not come down himself to prove to men his worth, He sought our worship through the child he placed upon the earth. But be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, In spirit, in faith, in purity. How can I best express my life? Wherein does greatness lie: How can I long remembrance win, since I am born to die? Both fame and gold are selfish things; their charms may quickly flee, But I'm the father of a boy who came to speak for me. In him lies all I hope to be; his splendor shall be mine; I shall have done man's greatest work if only he is fine. If some day he shall help the world long after I am dead, In all that men shall say of him my praises shall be said, It matters not what I may win of fleeting gold or fame, My hope of joy depends alone on what my boy shall claim. My story must be told through him; for him I work and plan, Man's greatest duty is to be the father of a man.

Edgar Albert Guest (1881 - 1959)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Douglas Jerrold on charm, insanity, and power

The alleged power to charm down insanity, or ferocity in beasts, is a power behind the eye.

Douglas Jerrold (1803 - 1857)

Source: Behaviour.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Clark Gable on charm

in

Scarlett: Sir, you are no gentleman. Rhett: And you, miss, are no lady. . . . Don't think that I hold that against you. Ladies have never held any charm for me.

Clark Gable (1901 - 1960)

Source: As Rhett Butler in Gone With The Wind, 1939 — based on Margaret Mitchell's novel

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero on brevity and charm

Brevity is a great charm of eloquence.

Cicero (106 - 43 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Wesley on anticipation, belief, charm, christ, death, earth, fear, god, grace, health, heaven, humility, jesus, life, listening, love, music, peace, power, and praise

Oh for a thousand tongues to sing my great Redeemer's praise, the glories of my God and King, the triumphs of his grace! My gracious Master and my God, assist me to proclaim, to spread through all the earth abroad the honors of thy name. Jesus! the name that charms our fears, that bids our sorrows cease; 'tis music in the sinner's ears, 'tis life, and health, and peace. He breaks the power of canceled sin, he sets the prisoner free; his blood can make the foulest clean; his blood availed for me. He speaks, and listening to his voice, new life the dead receive; the mournful, broken hearts rejoice, the humble poor believe. In Christ, your head, you then shall know, shall feel your sins forgiven, anticipate your heaven below, and own that love in heaven.

Charles Wesley (1707 - 1788)

Source: hymn

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Brooke Foss Westcott on atheism, charm, christianity, church, conscience, day, duty, divinity, earth, faith, fatherhood, future, generations, god, heaven, language, life, men, past, practicality, pride, rest, separation, present, thought, trad

It is not enough to hold that God did great things for our fathers: not enough to pride ourselves on the inheritance of victories of faith: not enough to build the sepulchres of those who were martyred by men unwilling, in their day of trial as we may be in our own, to hear new voices of a living God. Our duty is to see whether God is with us; whether we expect great things from Him; whether we do not practically place Him far off, forgetting that, if He is, He is about us, speaking to us words that have not been heard before, guiding us to paths on which earlier generations have not been able to enter. There is - most terrible thought! - a practical atheism, orthodox in language, reverent in bearing, which can enter a Christian church and charm the conscience to rest with shadowy traditions; an atheism which grows incessantly within us if we separate what cannot be separated with impunity, the secular from the divine, the past and the future from the present, earth from heaven, the things of Caesar from the things of God.

Brooke Foss Westcott (1825 - 1901)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Brian Masters on charm and evil

in

Evil is something you recognize immediately you see it: it works through charm.

Brian Masters (1939 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on brothers, charm, children, family, friendship, good, holidays, home, laughter, mind, money, pleasure, reflection, rest, sister, temptation, understanding, and worth

When I was a child of seven years old, my friends, on a holiday, filled my pocket with coppers. I went directly to a shop where they sold toys for children; and, being charmed with the sound of a whistle, that I met by the way in the hands of another boy, I voluntarily offered and gave all my money for one. I then came home, and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers, and sisters, and cousins, understanding the bargain I had made, told me I had given four times as much for it as it was worth; put me in mind what good things I might have bought with the rest of the money; and laughed at me so much for my folly, that I cried with vexation; and the reflection gave me more chagrin than the whistle gave me pleasure. This however was afterwards of use to me, the impression continuing on my mind; so that often, when I was tempted to buy some unnecessary thing, I said to myself, "Don't give too much for the whistle;" and I saved my money.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: letter to Madame Brillon, Nov 10, 1779. —The Works of Benjamin Franklin, ed. J Sparks,1836

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content