charm

A Quote by Karl Friedrich Gauss on character, charm, discovery, simplicity, success, and theory

A great part of its [higher arithmetic] theories derives an additional charm from the peculiarity that important propositions, with the impress of simplicity on them, are often easily discovered by induction, and yet are of so profound a character that we cannot find the demonstrations till after many vain attempts; and even then, when we do succeed, it is often by some tedious and artificial process, while the simple methods may long remain concealed.

Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855)

Source: H. Eves Mathematical Circles Adieu, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1977.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on birds, change, charm, earth, heaven, seasons, silence, and time

With thee conversing I forget all time, All seasons, and their change,--all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glist'ring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful ev'ning mild; then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train: But neither breath of morn when she ascends With charm of earliest birds, nor rising sun On this delightful land, nor herb, fruit, flower, Glist'ring with dew, nor fragrance after showers, Nor grateful ev'ning mild, nor silent night With this her solemn bird, nor walk by moon Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 639.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on charm, fate, losing, providence, reason, songs, and soul

In discourse more sweet; For eloquence the soul, song charms the sense. Others apart sat on a hill retir'd, In thoughts more elevate, and reason'd high Of providence, foreknowledge, will, and fate, Fix'd fate, free-will, foreknowledge absolute; And found no end, in wand'ring mazes lost.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 555.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on beginning, birds, charm, day, earth, gloom, inferiority, influence, kiss, needs, peace, shame, wonder, world, and elightenment

But peaceful was the night Wherein the Prince of Light His reign of peace upon the earth began. The winds with wonder whist, Smoothly the waters kiss, Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean,- Who now hath quite forgot to rave, While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed wave. The stars, with deep amaze, Stand fixed in steadfast gaze, Bending one way their precious influence; And will not take their flight, For all the morning light, Or Lucifer that often warmed them thence; But in their glimmering orbs did glow, Until their Lord himself bespake, and bid them go. And, though the shady gloom Had given day her room, The sun himself withheld his wonted speed, And hid his head for shame, As his inferior flame The new-enlightened world no more should need: He saw a greater Sun appear Than his bright throne or burning axeltree could bear.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Peaceful Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Mason Brown on charm and women

Charm is a glow within a woman that casts a most becoming light on others.

John Mason Brown

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A Quote by John Keats on charm and dreams

Those green-robed senators of mighty woods, Tall oaks, branch-charmed by the earnest stars, Dream, and so dream all night without a stir.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Hyperion. Book i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on charm, heart, home, magic, and tears

Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that ofttimes hath Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Ode to a Nightingale.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Fitzgerald Kennedy on charm, cities, and efficiency

Washington [D.C.] is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm.

John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Erskine on beauty, charm, and women

There's a difference between beauty and charm. A beautiful woman is one I notice. A charming woman is one who notices me.

John Erskine (1879 - 1951)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on art, chance, charm, fate, men, slavery, sleep, and war

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, And poppy, or charms, can make us sleep as well, And better than thy stroke. Why swell'st thou then?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: Holy Sonnets, No. 10

Contributed by: Zaady

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