charm

A Quote by Mitch on ironman, invisible, self confidence, and charm

Becoming an Ironman is like putting an invisible self-confidence charm in your pocket.

Mitch Thrower

Source: "The Attention Deficit Workplace" by Mitch Thrower

Contributed by: Mitch

A Quote by Shams-ud-din Muhammad (Hafiz) on love, angel, dance, god, heart, mind, style, waltz, crush, sweet, kiss, charm, patience, gamble, divine, and music

You have
not danced so badly, my dear,
trying to hold hands with the Beautiful One.

You have waltzed with great style, my sweet, crushed angel,
to have ever neared God's heart at all.

Our Partner is notoriously difficult to follow, and even His
best musicians are not always easy to hear.

So what if the music has stopped for a while.
So what if the price of admission to the Divine is out of reach tonight.

So what, my sweetheart, if you lack the ante to gamble for real love.

The mind and the body are famous for holding the heart ransom,
but Hafiz knows the Beloved's eternal habits. Have patience,
for He will not be able to resist your longings
and charms for long.

You have not danced so badly, my dear,
trying to kiss the Magnificent
One.

You have actually waltzed with tremendous style,
my sweet, O my sweet,
crushed
angel.

Hafiz

Source: Love Poems from God: Twelve Sacred Voices from the East and West

Contributed by: Katy

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charm, feeling, interest, love, mountains, needs, passion, and thought

The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion; the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, An appetite; a feeling and a love that had no need of a remoter charm by thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charm, happiness, love, and poetry

Myriads of daisies have shone forth in flower Near the lark's nest, and in their natural hour Have passed away; less happy than the one That by the unwilling ploughshare died to prove The tender charm of poetry and love.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Poems composed during a Tour in the Summer of 1833. xxxvii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charm, music, and shyness

Soft is the music that would charm forever; The flower of sweetest smell is shy and lowly.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Not Love, not War.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charm, feeling, interest, love, mountains, needs, and passion

The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion; the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite,-a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm By thoughts supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Lines completed a few miles above Tintern Abbey.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on charm

in

I'll charm the air to give a sound.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MACBETH, Act 4, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on birds, birth, charm, christmas, power, seasons, spirit, and time

Cock-crow at Christmas Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long; And then, they say, no spirit can walk abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on accidents, beauty, charm, faith, farewells, heroism, negotiation, proof, and trust

Let every eye negotiate for itself And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood. This is an accident of hourly proof, Which I mistrusted not. Farewell, therefore, Hero!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on birth, blindness, charm, darkness, dogs, good, hell, judaism, sleep, and trouble

First Witch Round about the cauldron go; In the poison'd entrails throw. Toad, that under cold stone Days and nights has thirty-one Swelter'd venom sleeping got, Boil thou first i' the charmed pot. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. Second Witch Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Third Witch Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf, Witches' mummy, maw and gulf Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark, Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark, Liver of blaspheming Jew, Gall of goat, and slips of yew Silver'd in the moon's eclipse, Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips, Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliver'd by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab: Add thereto a tiger's chaudron, For the ingredients of our cauldron. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Second Witch Cool it with a baboon's blood, Then the charm is firm and good.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 4, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

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