character

A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on argument, character, decisions, and stupidity

Once the decision has been made, close your ear even to the best counter argument: sign of a strong character. Thus an occasional will to stupidity.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Billy Graham on character, health, losing, and wealth

When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost.

Billy Graham (1918 - 1995)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on character, improvement, motives, personality, personality, privacy, promises, and relationships

The ''Inside-Out'' approach to personal and interpersonal effectiveness means to start first with self; even more fundamentally, to start with the most inside part of self -- with your paradigms, your character, and your motives. The inside-out approach says that private victories precede public victories, that making and keeping promises to ourselves recedes making and keeping promises to others. It says it is futile to put personality ahead of character, to try to improve relationships with others before improving ourselves.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on action, character, ethics, personality, personality, relationships, and words

The most important ingredient we put into any relationship is not what we say or what we do, but what we are. And if our words and our actions come from superficial human relations techniques (the Personality Ethic) rather than from our own inner core (the Character Ethic), others will sense that duplicity. We simply won't be able to create and sustain the foundation necessary for effective interdependence.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on character and habits

Our character is basically a composite of our habits. Because they are consistent, often unconcious patterns, they constantly, daily, express our character...

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on belief, character, ethics, experience, happiness, learning, life, people, principles, and success

The character ethic, which I believe to be the foundation of success, teaches that there are basic principles of effective living, and that people can only experience true success and enduring happiness as they learn and integrate these principles into their basic character.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on apologies, character, heart, order, pity, principles, security, and strength

It takes a great deal of character strength to apologize quickly out of one's heart rather than out of pity. A person must possess himself and have a deep sense of security in fundamental principles and values in order to genuinely apologize.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anthony (Tony) Robbins on character and difficulty

Surmounting difficulty is the crucible that forms character.

Tony Robbins (1960 -)

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A Quote by Zig Ziglar on belief, character, effort, and money

I believe that persistent effort, supported by a character-based foundation, will enable you to get more of the things money will buy and all of the things money won't buy.

Zig Ziglar (1926 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Woodrow Wilson on art, character, gifts, growth, guidance, judgment, life, men, motives, play, purpose, secrets, seriousness, spirit, and spirituality

A man is the part he plays among his fellows. He is not isolated; he cannot be. His life is made up of the relations he bears to others - is made or marred by those relations, guided by them, judged by them, expressed in them. There is nothing else upon which he can spend his spirit - nothing else that we can see. It is by these he gets his spiritual growth; it is by these we see his character revealed, his purpose, his gifts. A few (men) act as those who have mastered the secrets of a serious art, with deliberate subordination of themselves to the great end and motive of the play. These have "found themselves," and have all the ease of a perfect adjustment.

Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

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