certainty

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on certainty, chance, delay, expectation, future, power, present, time, and uncertainty

The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on anxiety, blessings, bravery, certainty, cheerfulness, constancy, contentment, darkness, dependence, duty, equality, fear, fortune, future, god, good, greatness, happiness, hope, indifference, joy, mankind, mind, people

True happiness is to understand our duties toward God and man; to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future; not to amuse ourselves with either hopes or fears, but to rest satisfied with what we have, which is abundantly sufficient; for he that is so wants nothing. The great blessings of mankind are with us, and within our reach; but we shut our eyes and, like people in the dark, fall foul of the very thing we search for without finding it. Tranquility is a certain equality of mind which no condition of fortune can either exalt or depress. There must be sound mind to make a happy man; there must be constancy in all conditions, a care for the things of this world but without anxiety; and such an indifference to the bounties of fortune that either with them or without them we may live content. True joy is serene. . . . The seat of it is within, and there is no cheerfulness like the resolution of a brave mind that has fortune under its feat. It is an invincible greatness of mind not to be elevated or dejected with good or ill fortune. A wise man is content with his lot, whatever it be - without wishing for what he has not.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on certainty, charm, and happiness

Fireside happiness, to hours of ease Blest with that charm, the certainty to please.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Human Life.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on certainty and uncertainty

He is no wise man that will quit a certainty for an uncertainty.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: The Idler. No. 57.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on certainty, curiosity, and mind

Curiosity is one of the permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous mind.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: The Rambler, March 12, 1751

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on certainty and thought

Who thought he 'd won The field as certain as a gun.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras. Part i. Canto iii. Line 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Clement of Alexandria on acceptance, age, beginning, belief, brothers, certainty, character, christ, church, cities, companions, cooperation, corruption, crime, death, departure, divinity, elderly, evil, familiarity, fatherhood, fear, fo

An apocryphal story from the writings of Clement of Alexandria regarding John the Apostle quoted by John H. Vandenberg, Conference Report, October 1963, p.45 - p.46: ". . . about John the Apostle, handed down and preserved in memory. When, on the death of the tyrant, he (John) passed over to Ephesus from the Island of Patmos, he used to make missionary journeys also to neighboring gentile cities, in some places to appoint bishops, and in some to set in order whole churches and . . . to appoint one of those indicated by the Spirit. On his arrival then at one of the cities at no great distance, of which some even mention the name, . . . he saw a youth of stalwart frame and winning countenance, and impetuous spirit, and said to the bishop, 'I entrust to thee this youth with all earnestness, calling Christ and the Church to witness.' The bishop accepted the trust, and made all the requisite promises, and the apostle renewed his injunction and adjuration. He then returned to Ephesus, and the elder taking home with him the youth who had been entrusted to his care, maintained, cherished, and finally baptized him. After this he abandoned further care and protection of him, considering that he had affixed to him the seal of the Lord as a perfect amulet against evil. Thus prematurely neglected, the youth was corrupted by certain idle companions of his own age, who were familiar with evil, and who first led him astray by many costly banquets, and then took him out by night with them to share in their felonious proceedings, finally demanding his cooperation in some worse crime. First familiarized with guilt, and then, from the force of his character, starting aside from the straight path like some mighty steed that seizes the bit between its teeth; he rushed towards headlong ruin, and utterly abandoning the divine salvation, gathered his worst comrades around him, and became a most violent, bloodstained, and reckless bandit-chief. Not long afterwards John was recalled to the city, and after putting other things in order said, 'Come now, O bishop, restore to me the deposit which I and the Saviour entrusted to thee, with the witness of the Church over which thou dost preside.' At first the bishop in his alarm mistook the meaning of the metaphor, but the apostle said, 'I demand back the young man and the soul of the brother.' Then groaning from the depth of his heart and shedding tears, 'He is dead,' said the bishop. 'How and by what death?' 'He is dead to God! For he has turned out wicked and desperate, and, to sum up all, a brigand; and now, instead of the Church he has seized the mountain, with followers like himself.' Then the apostle, rending his robe and beating his head, with loud wailing said, 'A fine guardian of our brother's soul did I leave! Give me a horse and a guide.' Instantly, . . . he rode away . . . from the Church and arriving at the brigands' outposts, was captured without flight or resistance, but crying, 'For this I have come. Lead me to your chief.' The chief awaited him in his armour, but when he recognized John as he approached, he was struck with shame and turned to fly [flight]. But John pursued him as fast as he could, forgetful of his age, crying out, 'Why my son, dost thou fly [flee] from thine own father, unarmed, aged as he is? Pity me, . . . fear not . . . stay! believe! Christ sent me.' But he on hearing these words first stood with downcast gaze, then flung away his arms, then trembling, began to weep bitterly, and embraced the old man when he came up to him, pleading with his groans, . . . but the apostle pledging himself . . . led him back to the Church and praying for him . . . and wrestling with him in earnest fastings . . . did not depart, as they say, till he restored him to the bosom of the Church."

Saint Clement of Alexandria (c.150 - c.220)

Source: St. Clement of Alexandria, Quis Divinitus Salv., chapter 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Augustine of Hippo on certainty, consequences, death, force, kindness, life, needs, and time

Of this I am certain, that no one has ever died who was not destined to die some time. Now the end of life puts the longest life on a par with the shortest. . . . And of what consequence is it what kind of death puts an end to life, since he who has died once is not forced to go through the same ordeal a second time? They, then, who are destined to die, need not be careful to inquire what death they are to die, but into what place death will usher them.

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 - 430)

Source: The City of God

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudolph Carnap on certainty, change, conflict, experience, kindness, language, logic, mathematics, physics, radicals, revolution, rules, science, truth, and value

I should make a distinction between two kinds of readjustment in the case of a conflict with experience, namely, between a change in the language, and a mere change in or addition of, a truth-value ascribed to an indeterminate statement (i.e. a statement whose truth value is not fixed by the rules of language, say by the postulates of logic, mathematics and physics). A change of the first kind constitutes a radical alteration, sometimes a revolution, and it occurs only at certain historically decisive points in the development of science. On the other hand, changes of the second kind occur every minute. A change of the first kind constitutes, strictly speaking, a transition from a language Ln into a new language Ln+1.

Rudolph Carnap

Source: "Replies and Systematic Expositions," Schlipp, The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap [Carnap63], p921

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roy Howard on action, business, certainty, direction, effort, facts, maturity, men, and mind

Salesmen should bear in mind that more mature men who have reached a certain point in business buy rather than are sold. A real salesman does not attempt to sell his prospect but instead directs his efforts towards putting the prospect in a frame of mind so that he will be moved to action by a given set of facts.

Roy Howard

Contributed by: Zaady

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