certainty

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on certainty, life, and sacred

Do not shorten the morning by getting up late; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Ashe on certainty

I don't care who you are, you're going to choke in certain matches. You get to a point where your legs don't move and you can't take a deep breath. You start to hit the ball about a yard wide, instead of inches.

Arthur Ashe (1943 - 1993)

Source: The New York Public Library Book of 20th Century American Quotations, by Stephen Donadio, 1992

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arnold Palmer on beginning, certainty, challenge, courage, day, inspiration, life, losing, mind, motivation, poetry, practice, problems, success, work, and world

THE MAN WHO THINKS HE CAN: If you think you are beaten, you are, If you think that you dare not, you don't, If you'd like to win, but you think you can't, It's almost certain you won't. If you think you'll lose, you've lost, For out in the world you'll find, Success begins with a fellow's will, It's all in the state of mind. If you think you are outclassed, you are, You've got to think high to rise, You've got to be sure of yourself before You can ever win a prize. Life's battles don't always go To the stronger or faster man, But soon or late the man who wins Is the man who thinks he can. NOTE: A copy of this inspirational poem hangs on the wall in Arnold Palmer's office. Arnie has made it a practice to read the poem at the start of each day. It serves him as a source of inspiration, courage and motivation that enables him to attack whatever problems and challenges that day might bring. It works for Arnie. It will work for you. Try it.

Arnold Palmer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Enoch Arnold Bennett on achievement, certainty, confidence, decisions, labor, and self-confidence

Having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. The gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense.

Arnold Bennett (1867 - 1931)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Enoch Arnold Bennett on certainty, experience, pain, and pleasure

It is within the experience of everyone that when pleasure and pain reach a certain intensity they are indistinguishable.

Arnold Bennett (1867 - 1931)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle Onassis on certainty, goals, and money

After a certain point money is meaningless. It ceases to be the goal. The game is what counts.

Aristotle Onassis (1906 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on certainty, children, fatherhood, and motherhood

Mothers are fonder than fathers of their children because they are more certain they are their own.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on action, anxiety, certainty, character, citizenship, performance, and virtue

What the statesman is most anxious to produce is a certain moral character in his fellow citizens, namely a disposition to virtue and the performance of virtuous actions.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on birth, certainty, children, fatherhood, giving, motherhood, reason, and suffering

This is the reason why mothers are more devoted to their children than fathers: it is that they suffer more in giving them birth and are more certain that they are their own.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Archimedes on books, certainty, earth, lies, and universe

Whether or not Copernicus knew it, even genuine heliocentrism had at least one ancient advocate: "But Aristarchus of Samos brought out a book consisting of certain hypotheses, in which the premises lead to the conclusion that the universe is many times greater than that now so called. His hypotheses are that the fixed stars and the sun remain motion less, that the earth revolves about the sun in the circumference of a circle, the sun lying in the middle of the orbit, and that the sphere of the fixed stars, situated about the same center as the sun, is so great that the circle in which he supposes the earth to revolve bears such a proportion to the distance of the fixed stars as the center of the sphere bears to its surface."

Archimedes (c.. 287 - 212 BC)

Source: The Sand-Reckoner by Aristarchus of Samos, Third Century B.C.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content