certainty

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on certainty, life, and principles

There is always much to be said for not attempting more than you can do, and for making a certainty of what you try. But this principle, like others in life, has its exceptions.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: A Churchill Reader, edited by Colin Coote

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A Quote by Winifred Gallagher on certainty, divinity, heroism, history, inspiration, people, poetry, and world

Since the history's first epic poem recorded the visit of the Sumerian hero Gilgamesh to a special grove of cedars, certain natural spots scattered around the world - Ayers Rock, Mount Fuji, Canyon de Chelly, the springs at Lourdes, the Ganges River, and hundreds of others - have drawn people seeking insight, inspiration, healing or proximity to the divine.

Winifred Gallagher

Source: The Power of Place, 1993

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A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on certainty

There is only one thing about which I am certain, and this is that there is very little about which one can be certain.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir William Jones on animals, certainty, cruelty, ignorance, learning, nobility, vices, and wealth

Cruelty to dumb animals is one of the distinguishing vices of low and base minds. Wherever it is found, it is a certain mark of ignorance and meanness; a mark which all the external advantages of wealth, splendour, and nobility, cannot obliterate. It is consistent neither with learning nor true civility.

William Jones (1746 - 1794)

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A Quote by Admiral William D. Leahy on adoption, atoms, certainty, children, conventionality, darkness, defeat, enemies, ethics, fashion, feeling, future, peace, possessions, possibility, potential, practicality, presidency, sentimentality, success, time

Those who dismiss "revisionist" qualms about the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as indulgences in peace-time sentimentality must count President Truman's own Chief of Staff among the bleeding hearts: "It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender because of the effective sea blockade and the successful bombing with conventional weapons. . . . The lethal possibilities of atomic warfare in the future are frightening. My own feeling was that in being the first to use it, we had adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages. I was not taught to make war in that fashion , and wars cannot be won by destroying women and children. We were the first to have this weapon in our possession, and the first to use it. There is a practical certainty that potential enemies will have it in the future and that atomic bombs will some time be used against us."

William D. Leahy

Source: I Was There, 1950

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A Quote by William Butler Yeats on certainty, good, and words

Words alone are certain good.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: Crossways, 1889, The Song of the Happy Shepherd

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A Quote by William Butler Yeats on certainty and women

It's certain that fine women eat A crazy salad with their meat.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: Michael Robartes and the Dancer , 1921. A Prayer for My Daughter

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A Quote by William Butler Yeats on brevity, certainty, dreams, heart, kindness, kiss, love, passion, thinking, women, and worth

Never give all the heart, for love Will hardly seem worth thinking of To passionate women if it seem Certain, and they never dream That it fades out from kiss to kiss For everything that's lovely is But a brief, dreamy kind delight.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: the Seven Woods, 1904. Never Give All the Heart

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A Quote by William Butler Yeats on certainty and needs

It's certain there is no fine thing Since Adam's fall but needs much laboring.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: the Seven Woods, 1904. Adam's Curse, . st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

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