business

A Quote by Charles Michael Schwab on business, dreams, imagination, success, and vision

A man to carry on a successful business must have imagination. He must see things as in a vision, a dream of the whole thing.

Charles Schwab (1862 - 1939)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Michael Schwab on business and secrets

Keeping a little ahead of conditions is one of the secrets of business; the trailer seldom goes far.

Charles Schwab (1862 - 1939)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on beauty, business, christianity, communication, death, garden, god, good, heart, inventions, language, paradise, silence, simplicity, and world

What a dead thing is a clock, with its ponderous embowelments of lead and brass, its pert or solemn dullness of communication, compared with the simple altar-like structure and silent heart-language of the old sundials! It stood as the garden god of Christian gardens. Why is it almost everywhere vanished? If its business-use be superseded by more elaborate inventions, its moral uses, its beauty, might have pleaded for its continuance. It spoke of moderate labours, of pleasures not protracted after sunset, of temperance, and good hours. It was the primitive clock, the horologue of the first world. Adam could scare have missed it in Paradise.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Essays, 1823

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on borrowing, business, character, debt, friendship, good, money, patience, and people

I am accounted by some people as a good man. How cheap that character is acquired! Pay your debts, don't borrow money, nor twist your kitten's neck off, nor disturb a congregation, etc., your business is done. I know things of myself, which would make every friend I have fly me as a plague patient.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on business, coaching, guests, and women

Returning to town in the stage-coach, which was filled with Mr. Gilman's guests, we stopped for a minute or two at Kentish Town. A woman asked the coachman, "Are you full inside?" Upon which Lamb put his head through the window and said, "I am quite full inside; that last piece of pudding at Mr. Gilman's did the business for me."

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Autobiographical Recollections. (Leslie.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles F. Abbott on business, courage, soldiers, war, and wealth

To manage a business successfully requires as much courage as that possessed by the soldier who goes to war. Business courage is the more natural because all the benefits which the public has in material wealth come from it.

Charles F. Abbott

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles F. Abbott on business and profit

Business without profit is not business any more than a pickle is candy.

Charles F. Abbott

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A Quote by Charles Dudley Warner on business, love, pleasure, purity, and world

The love of dirt is among the earliest of passions, as it is the latest. Mud-pies gratify one of our first and best instincts. So long as we are dirty, we are pure. Fondness for the ground comes back to a man after he has run the round of pleasure and business, eaten dirt, and sown wild oats, drifted about the world, and taken the wind of all its moods. The love of digging in the ground (or of looking on while he pays another to dig) is as sure to come back to him, as he is sure, at last, to go under the ground, and stay there.

Charles Dudley Warner (1829 - 1900)

Source: My Summer in a Garden, 1870

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on business and men

"Do other men for they would do you." That's the true business precept.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Martin Chuzzelwit.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Catherine Marshall on advice, agreement, beginning, business, chance, children, criticism, doubt, failure, fatherhood, god, impatience, thought, trust, and work

The late Peter Marshall illustrated our trust or lack of trust with the following story: Suppose a child has a broken toy. He brings the toy to his father, saying that he himself has tried to fix it and has failed. He asks his father to do it for him. The father gladly agrees . . . takes the toy . . and begins to work. Now obviously the father can do his work most quickly and easily if the child make no attempt to interfere, simply sits quietly watching, or even goes about other business, with never a doubt that the toy is being successfully mended. But, what do most of God's children do in such a situation? Often we stand by offering a lot of meaningless advice and some rather silly criticism. We even get impatient and try to help, and so get our hands in the Father's way, generally hindering the work. . . Finally, in our desperation, we may even grab the toy out of the Father's hands entirely, saying rather bitterly that we hadn't really thought He could fix it anyway . . . that we'd given him a chance and He had failed us.

Catherine Marshall

Source: Beyond Ourselves

Contributed by: Zaady

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