business

A Quote by Steve Case on business, community, commerce, content, context, connectivity, perseverance, perspective, people, management, and leadership

When I was trying to popularize the concept of the Internet -- ten or 15 years ago -- I came up with this concept of "the 5 Cs." Services needed to have content, context, community, commerce, and connectivity. After that, when I was trying to think of what the key management principles were to build into the culture, I started talking about the Ps. The P's were things like passion, perseverance, perspective and people. I think the people aspect is really the most important one.

Steve Case

Source: Academy of Achievement: Steve Case Interview: http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/cas1int-1

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Stephen Shapiro on innovation, business, and creativity

Take it a step further and look to non-business analogies and metaphors. If redesigning a product, ask what the product is really like. If redesigning a computer chip, look to racing circuits, rivers, or anything with a flow. A gas pipeline company developed a new technology for finding and sealing pipeline cracks by mirroring the clotting agents in the human body.

Stephen Shapiro

Source: Analogy Driven Innovation: http://www.steveshapiro.com/2008/02/19/analogy-driven-innovation/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, creative capitalism, corporations, and innovation

I hope corporations will dedicate a percentage of their top innovators' time to issues that could help people left out of the global economy. This kind of contribution is even more powerful than giving cash or offering employees' time off to volunteer. It is a focused use of what your company does best. It is a great form of creative capitalism, because it takes the brainpower and makes life better for the richest, and dedicates some of it to improving the lives of everyone else.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, creative capitalism, corporations, poverty, and social enterprise

We are living in a phenomenal age. If we can spend the early decades of the 21st century finding approaches that meet the needs of the poor in ways that generate profits and recognition for business, we will have found a sustainable way to reduce poverty in the world.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, and creative capitalism

Why do people benefit in inverse proportion to their need? Well, market incentives make that happen.

In a system of capitalism, as people's wealth rises, the financial incentive to serve them rises. As their wealth falls, the financial incentive to serve them falls, until it becomes zero. We have to find a way to make the aspects of capitalism that serve wealthier people serve poorer people as well.

The genius of capitalism lies in its ability to make self-interest serve the wider interest. The potential of a big financial return for innovation unleashes a broad set of talented people in pursuit of many different discoveries. This system, driven by self-interest, is responsible for the incredible innovations that have improved so many lives.

But to harness this power so it benefits everyone, we need to refine the system.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, and creative capitalism

As I see it, there are two great forces of human nature: self-interest, and caring for others. Capitalism harnesses self-interest in a helpful and sustainable way, but only on behalf of those who can pay. Government aid and philanthropy channel our caring for those who can't pay. But to provide rapid improvement for the poor we need a system that draws in innovators and businesses in a far better way than we do today.

Such a system would have a twin mission: making profits and also improving lives of those who don't fully benefit from today's market forces. For sustainability we need to use profit incentives wherever we can. At the same time, profits are not always possible when business tries to serve the very poor. In such cases there needs to be another incentive, and that incentive is recognition. Recognition enhances a company's reputation and appeals to customers; above all, it attracts good people to an organization. As such, recognition triggers a market-based reward for good behavior. In markets where profits are not possible, recognition is a proxy; where profits are possible, recognition is an added incentive.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, and creative capitalism

The challenge here is to design a system where market incentives, including profits and recognition, drive those principles to do more for the poor.

I like to call this idea creative capitalism, an approach where governments, businesses, and nonprofits work together to stretch the reach of market forces so that more people can make a profit, or gain recognition, doing work that eases the world's inequities.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill Gates on business, capitalism, conscious capitalism, conscious business, creative capitalism, red campaign, and bono

...one of the most inventive forms of creative capitalism involves someone we all know very well. A few years ago, I was sitting in a bar here in Davos with Bono. Late at night, after a few drinks, he was on fire, talking about how we could get a percentage of each purchase from civic-minded companies to help change the world. He kept calling people, waking them up, and handing me the phone to show me the interest.

Well, it's taken time to get this going, but he was right. If you give people a chance to associate themselves with a cause they care about, while buying a great product, they will. That was how the RED Campaign was born, here in Davos.

RED products are available from companies like Gap, Motorola, and Armani. Just this week, Dell and Microsoft joined the cause. Over the last year and a half, RED has generated $50 million for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, tuberculosis, and Malaria. As a result, nearly 2 million people in Africa are receiving life-saving drugs today.

Bill Gates

Source: Bill Gates: World Economic Forum 2008: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/exec/billg/speeches/2008/01-24WEFDavos.mspx

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Richard Branson on business, entrepreneurship, passion, and purpose

Ideally, since 80 percent of your life is spent working, you should start your business around something that is a passion of yours. If you're into kite-surfing and you want to become an entrepreneur, do it with kite-surfing.

Look, if you can indulge in your passion, life will be far more interesting than if you're just working. You'll work harder at it, and you'll know more about it. But first you must go out and educate yourself on whatever it is that you've decided to do - know more about kite-surfing than anyone else. That's where the work comes in. But if you're doing things you're passionate about, that will come naturally.

Richard Branson

Source: Branson's Next Big Bet: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2006/08/01/8382250/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Richard Branson on business, entrepreneurship, money, passion, and purpose

What was the first business idea you came up with?

I set up this magazine called Student when I was 16, and I didn't do it to make money - I did it because I wanted to edit a magazine. There wasn't a national magazine run by students, for students. I didn't like the way I was being taught at school. I didn't like what was going on in the world, and I wanted to put it right.

Of course, a lot of businesses want to reach students, so I funded the magazine by selling advertising. I sold something like $8,000 worth of advertising for the first edition, and that was in 1966. I printed up 50,000 copies, and I didn't even have to charge for them on the newsstand because my costs were already covered.

So I became a publisher by mistake - well, not quite by mistake, because I wanted to be an editor but I had to make sure the magazine would survive. The point is this: Most businesses fail, so if you're going to succeed, it has to be about more than making money.

Richard Branson

Source: Branson's Next Big Bet: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2006/08/01/8382250/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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