business

A Quote by Steve Pavlina on think, business, and groupthink

Think for yourself.  Unplug yourself from follow-the-follower groupthink, and virtually ignore what everyone else in your industry is saying (except the ones everyone agrees is crazy).  Do your own research, draw your own conclusions, set your own course, and stick to your guns.  When you’re just starting out, people will tell you you’re wrong.  After you’ve blown past them, they’ll tell you you’re crazy.  A few years after that, they’ll (privately) ask you to mentor them.

Steve Pavlina

Source: 10 Business Lessons From a Snarky Entrepreneur - http://www.stevepavlina.com/blog/2007/01/10-business-lessons-from-a-snarky-entrepreneur/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Steve Pavlina on networking, network, and business

Network selectively.  Nothing says “business newbie” like shotgun networking.  “You never know when someone might say yes” is marketing for dummies.  Take the time to build a profile of your ideal customers, and target your networking activities to reach them.  Speak to those who are already predisposed to want what you offer.  Almost any profile is better than “anyone with a pulse.”

Steve Pavlina

Source: 10 Business Lessons From a Snarky Entrepreneur - http://www.stevepavlina.com/blog/2007/01/10-business-lessons-from-a-snarky-entrepreneur/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Ken Robinson on education, business, and creativity

"We are educating people out of their creative capacities".

I heard a great story recently, I love telling it, of a little girl who was in a drawing lesson, she was 6 and she was at the back, drawing, and the teacher said this little girl hardly paid attention, and in this drawing lesson she did. The teacher was fascinated and she went over to her and she said, "What are you drawing?" and the girl said, "I'm drawing a picture of God." And the teacher said, "But nobody knows what God looks like." And the girl said, "They will in a minute."

(his son's Nativity play)...the first boy said, "I bring you gold." The second boy said, "I bring you myrhh." And the third boy said, "Frank sent this."

What these things have in common is that kids will take a chance.
If they don't know, they'll have a go.
Am I right?
They're not frightened of being wrong.

Now, I don't mean to say that being wrong is the same thing as being creative. What we do know is, if you're not prepared to be wrong, you'll never come up with anything original. If you're not prepared to be wrong. And by the time they get to be adults, most kids have lost that capacity. They have become frightened of being wrong.

And we run our companies like this, by the way, we stigmatize mistakes. And we're now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make.

And the result is, we are educating people out of their creative capacities.

Ken Robinson

Source: TED- http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/66

Contributed by: nrgsave

A Quote by Fred Kofman on business, conscious business, conscious capitalism, and work

What would a conscious business environment look like?

The most significant observation would be the total absence of abuse,shame,and threat. People would take responsibility for their behavior and deal with each other honestly and respectfully. They would hold themselves and each other accountable for adhering to some set of agreed-upon values and for working toward an agreed-upon vision. Deviations and errors would be an opportunity for learning and growth,rather than an excuse for blame and punishment.

There would still be problems,people that don’t get along,and losses. A conscious business environment is not a Garden of Eden where everything is always blissful. The marketplace is a turbulent place with no guarantees of success. The main difference displayed by a conscious business environment is that in addition to the drive to achieve their goals,people would experience also the commitment to operate according to their values. This commitment is the source of unconditional dignity that would give the organization and its members a core of luminosity from which to extend into the world.

A conscious business environment would be a challenge,an invitation to develop people’s physical,emotional,mental,and spiritual spheres. The conscious organization is a crucible where people refine themselves through service and partnership. As Khalil Gibran would say,a conscious business is a place where it becomes obvious that work is “love made visible.”

Fred Kofman

Source: Sounds True Interview with Fred Kofman: http://store.soundstrue.com/interview-kofman.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Richard Branson on mistakes and business

What has been your biggest mistake?

I find it very difficult to think of mistakes; not that I don't make any but because I was brought up to look only at the good things in life ... As for what lost the most money, probably Virgin Cola. It is still No 1 in Bangladesh though.

Richard Branson

Source: Thoroughly postmodern billionaire: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/apr/28/citynews.mondaymediasection

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Richard Branson on legacy, business, and vision

What would you like your legacy to be?

To have created one of the most respected companies in the world. Not necessarily the biggest.

Richard Branson

Source: Thoroughly postmodern billionaire: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/apr/28/citynews.mondaymediasection

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Sinegal on business and competition

There was a proposal in California that would keep out Wal-Mart but allow Costco. You opposed it. Are you nuts?

That's true: I always oppose these kinds of things. Competition makes us better. Some of our best stores have a Sam's Club next door.

Jim Sinegal

Source: CEO Interview: Costco's James Sinegal: http://www.smartmoney.com/mag/ceo/index.cfm?story=april2008-Costco

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jim Sinegal on prices and business

You could raise the price of, say, a bottle of ketchup to $1.03 instead of $1, and no one would know. Raising prices just 3% per product would add 50% to your pretax income. Why not do it?

It's like heroin: You do a little and you want a little bit more. Raising prices is the easy way.

Jim Sinegal

Source: CEO Interview: Costco's James Sinegal: http://www.smartmoney.com/mag/ceo/index.cfm?story=april2008-Costco

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Dee Hock on organizations and business

Well, years and years ago, I started to ask myself three very simple questions, which dominated my life for many years. One of them was, "Why are organizations everywhere, whether commercial, social, or religious, increasingly unable to manage their affairs?" The second question was, "Why are individuals throughout the world increasingly in conflict with and alienated from the organizations of which they're a part?" And the third was, "Why are society and the biosphere increasingly in disarray?" When I asked these questions to audiences a few years ago, they didn't have that much meaning to most people. But with such recent events as September 11 and the collapse of Enron and WorldCom, it's all pretty obvious now. So if all those things are true—and to me they're just as obvious as the nose on anybody's face—there has to be some deep, universal, underlying thing we're not getting at. There has to be.

Dee Hock

Source: WIE: Transformation by Design: http://www.wie.org/j22/hock.asp

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Dee Hock on organization, business, and purpose

Your organization needs to be absolutely clear about purpose and principles and must be very careful to know what a purpose and a principle is—you know, a purpose is not an objective, it's not a mission statement—a purpose is an unambiguous expression of that which people jointly wish to become. And a principle is not a platitude—it is a fundamental belief about how you intend to conduct yourself in pursuit of that purpose. You have to get very precise about these things. If the purpose and principles are constructive and healthy, then your organization will take a very different form than anything that you ever imagined. It will release the human spirit and will be constructive of the biosphere. Natural capital and human capital will be released in abundance and monetary capital will become relatively unimportant. To put it another way, I believe that purpose and principle, clearly understood and articulated, and commonly shared, are the genetic code of any healthy organization. To the degree that you hold purpose and principles in common among you, you can dispense with command and control. People will know how to behave in accordance with them, and they'll do it in thousands of unimaginable, creative ways. The organization will become a vital, living set of beliefs.

Dee Hock

Source: WIE: Transformation by Design: http://www.wie.org/j22/hock.asp

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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