buddhism

A Quote by unknown on problem, stress, buddhism, tibet, worry, solution, and film quote

If a problem can be solved, there is nothing to worry about. If it can't be solved, worrying will do no good.

unknown

Source: Movie "Seven Years in Tibet"

Contributed by: Marisa

A Quote by Ayya Khema on now, karma, and buddhism

Due to having made karma, rebirth consciousness arises. But we need not think of rebirth only in a future life. We are in actual fact reborn every moment with new thoughts and feelings, and we bring with us the karma that we made in past moments. If we were angry a moment ago, we are not going to feel good immediately. If we were loving a minute ago, we would be feeling fine now. Thus we live from moment to moment with the results of our karma. Every morning, particularly, can be seen as a rebirth. The day is young, we are full of energy, and have a whole day ahead of us. Every moment we get older and are tired enough in the evening to fall asleep and die a small death. All we can do then is toss and turn in bed, and our mind is dreamy and foggy. Every day can be regarded as a whole lifespan, since we can only live one day at a time; the past is gone and the future may or may not come; only this rebirth, this day, this moment, is important.

Ayya Khema

Source: http://lotusinthemud.typepad.com/sujatin/2007/11/only-this-rebir.html

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Andrew on religion, andrew wilcox, path, follow, following, follower, cheese, buddhism, christianity, integral, and science

The problem with following a religion is that you're being led by followers.  Followers don't know their own path.  How the heck do you expect them to know yours?

Andrew Wilcox

Contributed by: Andrew

A Quote by Dalai Lama on buddhism, matter, suffering, and happiness

Although you can find certain differences among the Buddhist philosophical schools about how the universe came into being, the basic common question addressed is how the two fundamental principles--external matter and internal mind or consciousness--although distinct, affect one another. External causes and conditions are responsible for certain of our experiences of happiness and suffering. Yet we find that it is principally our own feelings, our thoughts and our emotions, that really determine whether we are going to suffer or be happy.

Dalai Lama

Source: Dzogchen : The Heart Essence of the Great Perfection

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Elysha on accountability, advaita, adyashanti, apocalypse, authenticity, awakening, awareness, beauty, behaviour, being, bible, biology, bliss, buddha, buddhism, catholic, cessation, changes, christ, christian, clarity, communication, concepts

As you learn to leave alone the activity of unconsciously trying to be the mindbody that you think that you are - the mindbody that this "you" is currently flowing through - and you learn to move as this one that you truly are - this "you" of you; the very heart of existence - steadily, consciously and momentarily, the continuity of the ever deepening of this innermost as it keeps on entering its manifestation, through this mindbody that you find yourself flowing through, allows you to simply bubble in the sheer joy, pleasure, peace, delightfulness and stillness that this "you" of you is.

Elysha

Source: http://www.elysha.org

Contributed by: elysha

A Quote by Kalu Rinpoche on illusion, buddhism, reality, and emptiness

We live in illusion and the appearance of things. There is a reality. We are that reality. When we understand this, we see that we are nothing. And being nothing, we are everything. That is all.

Kalu Rinpoche

Source: http://www.dharma.org/ims/joseph_goldstein_interview1.html

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on attachment, clinging, and buddhism

Monks, when ignorance is abandoned, and knowledge arises in the monk, with the ending of ignorance and the arising of knowledge he clings neither to sense-pleasures, nor does he cling to views, nor to precepts and vows, nor to a Self-doctrine. Not clinking, he is not disturbed; not disturbed, he attains individually nibbana.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon (Routledgecurzon Critical Studies in Buddhism), Pages: 167

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Henepola Gunaratana on buddhism, mindfulness, patience, and self-discipline

"Discipline" is a difficult word for most of us. It conjures up images of somebody standing over you with a stick, telling you that you're wrong. But self-discipline is different. It's the skill of seeing through the hollow shouting of your own impulses and piercing their secret. They have no power over you. It's all a show, a deception. Your urges scream and bluster at you; they cajole; they coax; they threaten; but they really carry no stick at all. You give in out of habit. You give in because you never really bother to look beyond the threat. It is all empty back there. There is only one way to learn this lesson, though. The words on this page won't do it. But look within and watch the stuff coming up-restlessness, anxiety, impatience, pain-just watch it come up and don't get involved. Much to your surprise, it will simply go away. It rises, it passes away. As simple as that. There is another word for self-discipline. It is patience.

Henepola Gunaratana

Source: Mindfulness in Plain English, Updated and Expanded Edition

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Achaan Chah on buddhism

In practice, some come to see easily, some with difficulty. But whatever the case, never mind. Difficult or easy, the Buddha said not to be heedless. Just that--don't be heedless. Why? Because life is not certain. Wherever we start to think that things are certain, uncertainty is lurking right there. Heedlessness is just holding things as certain. It is grasping at certainty where there is no certainty and looking for truth in things that are not true. Be careful! They are likely to bite you sometime in the future!

Achaan Chah

Source: Being Dharma : The Essence of the Buddha's Teachings

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by sam harris on buddha, buddhism, and religion

The ninth-century Buddhist master Lin Chi is supposed to have said, “If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him.” Like much of Zen teaching, this seems too cute by half, but it makes a valuable point: to turn the Buddha into a religious fetish is to miss the essence of what he taught. In considering what Buddhism can offer the world in the twenty-first century, I propose that we take Lin Chi’s admonishment rather seriously. As students of the Buddha, we should dispense with Buddhism.

sam harris

Source: Shambhala Sun: Killing the Buddha: http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2903&Itemid=244

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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