buddhism

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, buddhism, quiescence, life, death, stillness, inertia, passivity, sensitivity, sympatheticism, will, distractions, concentration, thinking, irrelevancies, and spirit

Aimed at as something terminal or ultimate or absolute, quiescence is, from the standpoint of life, a form of death, a stillness and inertia, an impassivity. Life is infinite sensitivity to all things, the quicksilver sympatheticism of everything that belongs in the natural cosmos. The mind and will do close out or exclude extraneous distractions as a means to their powers of self-concentration ("Thinking is a momentary dismissal of irrelevancies," Buckminster Fuller). But Buddhism makes this quiescence not a means but an end in itself, incompatible as it may be with the very life of spirit and of will. Taken as a mere exercise or tonic, it has an utterly different value of course.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, buddhism, stoicism, worldliness, maya, suffering, desire, and spirituality

The way of the Buddha involves a metaphysical stoicism, a way of overcoming the power that worldliness has over oneself: the world rules us through our suffering no less than through our desires and appetites and hopes; all of this is Maya, the universe of delusorily desirable and despicable goods. The primal insight of Buddha is not that the suffering of the world must first be mitigated but rather that we must learn to recognize that our DESIRES are no less a form of SUFFERING than are our AILMENTS. This is what qualifies Buddhism as an authentic form of spirituality, its transcendence over the finite and merely psychological domain.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Bodhidharma on bodhidharma, zen, buddhism, buddhist, buddha, and enlightenment

"But people of the deepest understanding look within, distracted by nothing. Since a clear mind is the Buddha, they attain the understanding of a Buddha without using the mind." - Bodhidharma

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma

Contributed by: jsab0

A Quote by Janwillem van de Wetering on buddhism, zen, truth, and reality

To see what isn't true is easy. But to see what is true will take some doing.

Janwillem van de Wetering

Source: A Glimpse of Nothingness: Experiences in an American Zen Community

Contributed by: whoami

A Quote by Seng Ts'an on zen and buddhism

Not two.
Not two.
Just think not two.

Seng Ts'an

Source: http://www.zbtc.org/docs/kongo/faith.html

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Reginald H. Pawle on zen, buddhism, psychology, and western psychology

Inherent within the dilemma is a solution.

Reginald Pawle

Source: The Psychology of Zen Buddhism (dissertation)

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Reginald H. Pawle on zen, buddhism, psychology, western psychology, and freedom

It is not freedom from, but rather freedom within, freedom to.

Reginald Pawle

Source: The Psychology of Zen Buddhism (dissertation)

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Reginald H. Pawle on zen, buddhism, psychology, and western psychology

attend to experience simply without giving it meaning, feel it, and receive it

Reginald Pawle

Source: The Psychology of Zen Buddhism (dissertation)

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Reginald H. Pawle on zen, buddhism, psychology, and western psychology

Gradual awakening means that change and healing happen gradually as a result of the accumulation of causes. This is more the common way that healing is understood to occur. As a result of doing this and that a person gradually gets better.

Reginald Pawle

Source: The Psychology of Zen Buddhism (dissertation)

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Baizhang Huaihai on zen, chan, buddhism, and work

A day without work is a day without food.

Baizhang Huaihai

Contributed by: Louëlla

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