buddhism

A Quote by Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse on buddhism, renunciation, emptiness, and ego

Renunciation mind has nothing to do with sacrificing. When we talk about renunciation, somwhow we get all scared because we think that we have to give up some goodies, somehing valuable, some important things. But there is nothing  that is important; there is nothing that is solidly exisiting. All that you are give up is actually a vague identity .  You realize thigs is not true; it's noe the ultimate. This how and why to develop renunciation

Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Nagarjuna on buddhism, emptiness, anatta, and not-self

My acts are irrevocable
Because they have no essence...
Where are the doers of deeds
Absent among their conditions?
Imagine a magician
Who creates a creature
Who creates other creatures.
Acts I perform are creatures
Who create others.

Nagarjuna (c.100 - 200 AD)

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Chogyam Trungpa on chogyam trungpa, vajrayana, dharma, buddhism, life, death, nature, psychology, and ego

"The charnel ground is that great graveyard in which the complexities of samsara and nirvana lie buried."

Chogyam Trungpa

Source: Chogyam Trungpa

Contributed by: Tharlam

A Quote by Stephen Batchelor on buddhism and mindfulness

The Buddha described his teaching as "going against the stream." The unflinching light of mindful awareness reveals the extent to which we are tossed along in the stream of past conditioning and habit. The moment we decide to stop and look at what is going on (like a swimmer suddenly changing course to swim upstream instead of downstream), we find ourselves battered by powerful currents we had never even suspected - precisely because until that moment we were largely living at their command.

Stephen Batchelor

Source: http://lotusinthemud.typepad.com/sujatin/2008/09/going-against-t.html

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Bhante Wimala on mind and buddhism

mind is seen in buddhism as an activity rather than an entity

Bhante Wimala

Source: lessons of the lotus

Contributed by: Taikunping

A Quote by Ajahn Sumedho on mindfulness, concentration, and buddhism

Some people do not know the difference between "mindfulness" and "concentration." They concentrate on what they're doing, thinking that is being mindful. . . . We can concentrate on what we are doing, but if we are not mindful at the same time, with the ability to reflect on the moment, then if somebody interferes with our concentration, we may blow up, get carried away by anger at being frustrated. If we are mindful, we are aware of the tendency to first concentrate and then to feel anger when something interferes with that concentration. With mindfulness we can concentrate when it is appropriate to do so and not concentrate when it is appropriate not to do so.

Ajahn Sumedho

Source: http://lotusinthemud.typepad.com/sujatin/2008/09/mindfulness-and.html

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by jack Kornfield on buddhism, truth, and belief

One day Mara, the Buddhist god of ignorance and evil, was traveling through the villages of India with his attendants. He saw a man doing walking meditation whose face was lit up in wonder. The man had just discovered something on the ground in front of him. Mara's attendants asked what that was and Mara replied, "A piece of truth." "Doesn't this bother you when someone finds a piece of the truth, O evil one?" his attendants asked. "No," Mara replied. "Right after this they usually make a belief out of it."

Jack Kornfield

Source: Stories of the Spirit, Stories of the Heart

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Stephen Batchelor on buddhism, ethics, acceptance, and delusion

One finds that no matter how sincere one's intention to be attentive and aware, the mind rebels against such instructions and races off to indulge in all manner of distractions, memories and fantasies....The comforting illusion of personal coherence and continuity is ripped away to expose only fragmentary islands of consciousness separated by yawning gulfs of unawareness....The first step in this practice of mindful awareness is radical self-acceptance.

Such self-acceptance, however, does not operate in an ethical vacuum, where no moral assessment is made of one's emotional states. The training in mindful awareness is part of a Buddhist path with values and goals. Emotional states are evaluated according to whether they increase or decrease the potential for suffering. If an emotion, such as hatred or envy, is judged to be destructive, then it is simply recognized as such. It is neither expressed through violent thoughts, words or deeds, nor is it suppressed or denied as incompatiable with a "spiritual"life. In seeing it for what it is - a transient emotional state - one mindfully observes it follow its own nature: to arise, abide for a while, and then pass away.

Stephen Batchelor

Source: The Awakening of the West

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Pema Chodron on pema chodron, the wisdom of no escape, buddhism, pain, pleasure, meditation, courage, and growth

There's a common misunderstanding among all the human beings who have ever been born on the earth that the best way to live is to try to avoid pain and just try to get comfortable. You can see this even in insects and animals and birds. All of us are the same.

A much more interesting, kind, adventurous, and joyful approach to life is to begin to develop our curiosity, not caring whether the object of our inquisitiveness is bitter or sweet.  To lead a life that goes beyond pettiness and prejudice and always wanting to make sure that everything turns out on our own terms, to lead a more passionate, full, and delightful life than that, we must realize that we can endure a lot of pain and pleasure for the sake of finding out who we are and what this world is, how we tick and how our world ticks, how the whole thing just is.

Pema Chodron

Source: The Wisdom of No Escape: And the Path of Loving Kindness (Shambhala Classics), Pages: 3

Contributed by: crow

A Quote by Buddha on happiness, sorrow, life, struggles, detachment, and buddhism

"Happiness or sorrow- whatever befalls you, walk on untouched, unattached."

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: The Dhammapada

Contributed by: Holly

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