buddhism

A Quote by Nichiren Daishonin on buddhism, nichiren, and sgi

This passage refers to the great joy that one experiences
when one understands for the first time that one's mind
from the very beginning has been the Buddha.
Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the greatest of all joys.

Nichiren Daishonin

Source: www.sgi-usa.org, Daily Gosho,(Ongi kuden - Gosho Zenshu, page 788, The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, page 211) Selection source: Living Buddhism, Seikyo Shimbun, Jan. 17th, 2010

Contributed by: jaBuddha

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on compassion, buddhism, and suffering

A friend told me of visiting the Dalai Lama in India and asking him for a succinct definition of compassion. She prefaced her question by describing how heart-stricken she'd felt when, earlier that day, she'd seen a man in the street beating a mangy stray dog with a stick. “Compassion,” the Dalai Lama told her, “is when you feel as sorry for the man as you do for the dog.”

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on lovingkindness, self, brilliance, life, respect, and buddhism

Learning how to be kind to ourselves, learning how to respect ourselves, is important. The reason it's important is that, fundamentally, when we look into our own hearts and begin to discover what is confused and what is brilliant, what is bitter and what is sweet, it isn't just ourselves that we're discovering. We're discovering the universe.

Pema Chodron

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Mark Epstein on buddhism, language, words, and wisdom

As my Buddhist teachers have shown me, wisdom emerges in the space around words as much as from language itself.

Mark Epstein

Source: Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Mark Epstein on self, buddhism, and psychology

The central premise of this book is that the Western psychological notion of what it means to have a self is flawed.

Mark Epstein

Source: Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Mark Epstein on buddhism, happiness, self, and letting go

Buddhism teaches us that happiness does not come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. In Buddhism, the impenetrable, separate, and individuated self is more of the problem than the solution.

Mark Epstein

Source: Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Mark Epstein on happiness, buddhism, accumulation, completion, surrender, letting go, and perfection

When we seek happiness through accumulation, either outside of ourselves--from other people, relationships, or material goods--or from our own self-development, we are missing the essential point. In either case we are trying to find completion. But according to Buddhism, such a strategy is doomed. Completion comes not from adding another piece to ourselves but from surrendering our ideas of perfection.

Mark Epstein

Source: Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Darren Littlejohn on buddhism, self, salvation, and recovery

It's a relief, frankly, that in Buddhism, there is no self to save.

Darren Littlejohn

Source: The 12-Step Buddhist: Enhance Recovery from Any Addiction, Pages: 4

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Vidyadhara Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche on buddhism, realization, freedom, security, awakening, and enlightenment

The basics teachings of Buddha are about understanding what we are, who we are, why we are. When we begin to realize what we are, who we are, why we are, then we begin to realize what we are not, who we are not, why we are not. We begin to realize that we don’t have basic, substantial, solid, fundamental ground that we can exert anymore. We begin to realize that our ideas of security and our concept of freedom have been purely phantom experiences.

Chogyam Trungpa

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Shinjo Ito on buddhism, valuing, harmony, unity, respect, embrace, denounce, and true buddhism

The spirit of Buddhism is, more than anything, about valuing harmony and unity, in which others are respected and embraced rather than denounced. This has been the way of Buddhism since the beginning, and this is true Buddhism.

Shinjo Ito

Source: Shinjo: Reflections, Pages: 137

Contributed by: Meenakshi

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