blindness

A Quote by Jon Anderson on ambition, blindness, design, freedom, power, and reason

Cage of freedom, that's our prison; we're the jailer and captive combined Cage of freedom, cast in power; all the trappings of our own design. Blind ambition, steals our reason; we're soon behind those invisible bars On the inside, looking outside; to make it safer we double the guard.

Jon Anderson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on blindness, hope, life, mind, and nobility

(That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights, and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with th' abhorred shears And slits the thin-spun life.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Lycidas. Line 70.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on argument, blindness, clarity, conscience, contentment, day, friendship, guidance, heart, hope, idleness, liberty, losing, nobility, thought, women, and world

Cyriac, this three years' day these eyes, though clear, To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heav'n's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope; but still bear up and steer Right onward. What supports me, dost thou ask? The conscience, Friend, t' have lost them overplied In liberty's defence, my noble task, Of which all Europe rings from side to side. This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask Content, though blind, had I no better guide.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XXII, To The Same (Cyriac Skinner)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Lyly on blindness and sermons

It is a blind goose that cometh to the fox's sermon.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on atheism, belief, blindness, eternity, fate, men, and nations

The Hebrews have done more to civilize men than any other nation. If I were an atheist, and believed in blind eternal fate, I should still believe that fate had ordained the Jews to be the most essential instrument for civilizing the nations.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to F. A. Van der Kamp, February 16, 1809.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adair on attitude, blindness, humility, leadership, life, managers, and mistakes

The chief executive who knows his strengths and weaknesses as a leader is likely to be far more effective than the one who remains blind to them. He also is on the road to humility - that priceless attitude of openness to life that can help a manager absorb mistakes, failures or personal shortcomings.

John Adair (1757 - 1840)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jim Stovall on ability, accidents, blindness, emotion, illness, life, mediocrity, people, and seriousness

I've seen people recover physical abilities, yet never get over emotional trauma after a serious accident. I've seen other people overcome the psychological and emotional trauma of a serious illness even though they may never fully regain their physical capabilities. Which is the greater healing? Which is the better recovery? If I had the option of choosing between a mediocre life with eyesight or the life I have today, even though I am blind, I'd stay blind and keep the life I have.

Jim Stovall

Source: You Don't Have to Be Blind to See

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Martineau on art, blindness, bravery, difficulty, eternity, fear, god, heart, heaven, incredulity, life, love, passion, perspective, quiet, resolution, secrets, selfishness, sensuality, separation, silence, sorrow, soul, spirit, tears, t

Let any true man go into silence; strip himself of all pretense, and selfishness, and sensuality, and sluggishness of soul; lift off thought after thought, passion after passion, till he reaches the inmost depth of all; remember how short a time and he was not at all; how short a time again, and he will not be here; open his window and look upon the night, how still its breath, how solemn its march, how deep its perspective, how ancient its form of light; and think how little he knows except the perpetuity of God, and the mysteriousness of life: - and it will be strange if he does not feel the Eternal Presence as close upon his soul as the breeze upon his brow; if he does not say, "O Lord, art thou ever near as this, and have I not known thee?"- if the true proportions and the genuine spirit of life do not open on his heart with infinite clearness and show him the littleness of his temptations and the grandeur of his trust. He is ashamed to have found weariness in toil so light, and tears where there was no trial to the brave. He discovers with astonishment how small the dust that has blinded him, and from the height of a quiet and holy love looks down with incredulous sorrow on the jealousies and fears and irritations that have vexed his life. A mighty wind of resolution sets in strong upon him and freshens the whole atmosphere of his soul, sweeping down before it the light flakes of difficulty, till they vanish like snow upon the sea. He is imprisoned no more in a small compartment of time, but belongs to an eternity which is now and here. The isolation of his separate spirit passes away; and with the countless multitude of souls akin to God, he is but a wave of his unbounded deep. He is at one with Heaven, and hath found the secret place of the Almighty.

James Martineau (1805 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Keller on ancestry, blindness, clarity, compassion, corruption, direction, disease, divinity, errors, experience, guidance, ignorance, imperfection, laws, manners, nature, needs, observation, prejudice, providence, reason, understanding,

Sir William Blackstone, the great English jurist, writing in his Commentaries on the Laws of England in 1769, was most explicit in emphasizing the weakness of man's nature. As he observed: ". . . if our reason were always, as in our first ancestor before his transgression, clear and perfect,unruffled by passions, unclouded by prejudice, unimpaired by disease or intemperance, the task would be pleasant and easy; we should need no other guide but this. But every man now finds the contrary in his own experience; that his reason is corrupt, and his understanding full of ignorance and error. This has given manifold occasion for the benign interposition of divine Providence, which in compassion to the frailty, the imperfection, and the blindness of human reason, hath been pleased at sundry times and in divers manners, to discover and enforce its laws by an immediate and direct revelation. The doctrines thus delivered we call the revealed or divine law . . ."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Beattie on blindness and science

By the glare of false science betray'd, That leads to bewilder, and dazzles to blind.

James Beattie (1735 - 1803)

Source: The Hermit.

Contributed by: Zaady

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