bitterness

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on bitterness, joy, justice, time, and value

Make sure that your ambitions are really lofty - not just seem to be. Sometimes instead of engaging in those so called "mountaintop employments of great value," we spend our time in digging a pit and then falling therein, so that our temporary joy may become a permanent and bitter loss.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on anxiety, bitterness, boredom, christianity, day, eternity, knowledge, learning, life, people, and teachers

To live thus - to cram today with eternity and not wait the next day - the Christian has learnt and continues to learn (for the Christian is always learning) from the Pattern. How did He manage to live without anxiety for the next day - He who from the first instant of His public life, when He stepped forward as a teacher, knew how His life would end, that the next day was His crucifixion; knew this while the people exultantly hailed Him as King (ah, bitter knowledge to have at precisely that moment!); knew, when they were crying, Hosanna!, at His entry into Jerusalem, that they would cry, "Crucify Him!", and that it was to this end that He made His entry. He who bore every day the prodigious weight of this superhuman knowledge - how did He manage to live without anxiety for the next day?

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: Christian Discourses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on bitterness, death, failure, and ideas

The difference between a man who faces death for the sake of an idea and an imitator who goes in search of martyrdom is that the former expresses his idea most fully in death while the latter really enjoys the bitterness of failure.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on bitterness and mind

Nothing is so bitter that a calm mind cannot find comfort in it.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on bitterness

Of all the griefs that harass the distrest, Sure the most bitter is a scornful jest.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: London. Vanity of Human Wishes. Line 166.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Goldwyn on bitterness

You've got to take the bitter with the sour.

Samuel Goldwyn (1882 - 1974)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, bitterness, colors, problems, slavery, solution, and yielding

The freedmen were not really free in 1865, nor are most of their descendants really f ree in 1965. Slavery was but one aspect of a race and color problem that is still far from solution here, or anywhere. In America particularly, the grapes of wrath have not yet yielded all their bitter vintage.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 33

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on bitterness, charity, danger, inconsistency, lies, and religion

Then he saw also that it matters little what profession, whether of religion or irreligion, a man may make, provided only he follows it out with charitable inconsistency, and without insisting on it to the bitter end. It is in the uncompromisingness with which dogma is held and not in the dogma or want of dogma that the danger lies.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: The Way of All Flesh

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudyard Kipling on bitterness, evil, forgiveness, love, men, and simplicity

Teach us to delight in simple things; And mirth that has no bitter springs; Forgiveness free of evil done, And love to all men 'neath the sun.

Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on adversity, beginning, bitterness, charity, christmas, church, clarity, dance, darkness, day, fatherhood, garden, good, home, justice, kindness, life, motherhood, nature, pain, sons, soul, and understanding

Christmas at Sea The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand; The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could stand, The wind was a nor'-wester, blowing squally off the sea; And the cliffs and spouting breakers were the only thing a-lee. They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day; But 'twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout, And we gave her the maintops'l, and stood by to go about. All day we tack'd and tack'd between the South Head and the North; All day we haul'd the frozen sheets, and got no further forth; All day as cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread, For very life and nature we tack'd from head to head. We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide-race roar'd; But every tack we made we brought the North Head close aboard; So's we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers running high, And the coastguard in his garden, with his glass against his eye. The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam; The good red fires were burning bright in every 'longshore home; , The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volley'd out; And I vow we sniff'd the victuals as the vessel went about. The bells upon the church were rung with a right jovial cheer For it's just that I should tell you how (of all days in the year) This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn, And the house above the coastguard's was the house where I was born. O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there, My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver hair; And well I saw the firelight, like a flight of homely elves Go dancing round the china-plates that stand upon the shelves! And well I knew the talk they had, the talk that was of me, Of the shadow on the household and the son that went to sea; And O the wicked fool I seem'd, in every kind of way, To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas Day. They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall. "All hands to loose topgallant sails." I heard the captain call. "By the Lord, she'll never stand it," our first mate Jackson cried. . . . "It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," he replied. She stagger'd to her bearings, but the sails were new and good, And the ship smelt up to windward just as though she understood. As the winter's day was ending, in the entry of the night, We clear'd the weary headland, and pass'd below the light. And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but me, As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea; But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were growing old.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

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