birds

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on birds, dawn, and emptiness

LEAVE-TAKING Leave-taking is not birds gathered for one last hymn to summer on thin branches of an empty tree, nor grass, sodden and bent beneath winter's first rain-heavy snow. Leave-taking is not the sun reluctant to smile in a lowering sky, nor the moon taking leave of the stars at dawn one by one. Leave-taking is not the wind suddenly hushed in the rocking cradle of trees, nor the waves stunned and dazed, staring glassy-eyed after the parting storm. Leave-taking is not birds, grass, sun, moon, wind or waves; for these will all come again. Will you?

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: At the Edges, published by the Utah State Poetry Society, 1990

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on birds, garden, giving, and indolence

IN AUTUMN, I write of days smoldering like embers to ash, grass, stiff, green-weary, waiting for somnolent winter, everywhere, gathered birds stuck in spindly branches and gardens done with giving. . . of air, over-ripe, indolent, like the last great cluster of grapes on the vine, which winds its way across the wall, tendrils turned to wood.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: At the Edges, published by the Utah State Poetry Society, 1990

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on awareness, birds, dreams, earth, garden, rest, timidity, and words

WAKING In spring I write of earth still half asleep, of matted grass and weeds not yet aware that stretching fingers stir the soil down deep and sift the frozen dreams of roots with air that breathes forgotten scents of blossoming. I write of branches stiff and gnarled with cold, like ancient bones that can't remember spring or how the sun could painlessly unfold each timid, paling leaf. I write of birds returning one by one. They leave their flocks for tempting caterpillars scrawled like words across my garden wall of crumbling rocks. These early signs of spring unthaw my brain from numbing winter rest. I write again.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: At the Edges, published by the Utah State Poetry Society, 1990

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward H. Richards on birds

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A wise old owl sat on an oak; The more he saw the less he spoke; The less he spoke the more he heard; Why aren't we like that wise old bird?

Edward H. Richards

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edna St. Vincent Millay on birds, fear, soul, and world

Lord, I do fear Thou'st made the world too beautiful this year My soul is all but out of me-let fall No burning leaf; prithee, let no bird call.

Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892 - 1950)

Source: God's World, 1917, st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmond Jabes on argument, birds, controversy, doubt, meaning, and words

How could an argument soothe or settle a controversy when every word is a nest for a bird of doubt? (meaning of words as inferences)

Edmond Jabes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Y. Harburg on birds

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Somewhere over the rainbow Bluebirds fly. Birds fly over the rainbow - Why then, oh why can't I?

Edgar Y. Harburg (1898 - 1981)

Source: The Wizard of Oz, 1939, [Music by Harold Arlen.]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daisetz Teitaro "D.T." Suzuki on birds, life, water, and zen

Life, according to Zen, ought to be lived as a bird flies through the air, or as a fish swims in the water.

D.T. Suzuki (1870 - 1966)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Martin Henry Fischer on birds and drugs

Half of the modern drugs could well be thrown out of the window, except that the birds might eat them.

Dr. Henry Fischer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dorothy Parker on birds and plants

Every year, back comes Spring, with nasty little birds yapping their fool heads off and the ground all mucked up with plants.

Dorothy Parker (1893 - 1967)

Contributed by: Zaady

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