Bible

A Quote by Domus Ulixes on god, book, speak, and bible

I don't want to speak about God, because I am not here to review a book I haven't read entirely.

Frederik Kerling

Contributed by: Domus Ulixes

A Quote by sam harris on shakespeare, virgil, homer, belief, religion, faith, koran, and bible

There is, of course, much that is wise and consoling and beautiful in our religious books.  But words of wisdom and consolation and beauty abound in the pages of Shakespeare, Virgil, and Homer as well, and no one ever murdered strangers by the thousands because of the inspiration he found there.  The belief that certain books were written by God (who, for reasons difficult to fathom, made Shakespeare a far better writer than himself) leaves us powerless to address the most potent source of human conflict, past and present.  How is it that the absurdity of this idea does not bring us, hourly, to our knees?  It is safe to say that few of us would have thought so many people could believe such a thing, if they did not actually believe it.  Imagine a world in which generations of human beings come to believe that certain films were made by God or that specific software was coded by him.  Imagine a future in which millions of our descendants murder each other over rival interpretations of Star Wars or Windows 98.  Could anything – anything – be more ridiculous?  And yet, this would be no more ridiculous than the world we are living in.

sam harris

Source: The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, Pages: 35..6

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by sam harris on religion, belief, faith, koran, bible, and terrorism

Because they are believed to be nothing less than verbatim translations of God’s utterances, texts like the Koran and the Bible must be appreciated, and criticized, for any possible interpretations to which they are susceptible – and to which they will be subjected, with varying emphases and elisions, throughout the religious world.  The problem is not that some Muslims neglect to notice the few references to nonaggression that can be found in the Koran, and that this leads them to do terrible things to innocent unbelievers; the problem is that most Muslims believe that the Koran is the literal word of God.  The corrective worldview of Osama bin Laden is not to point out the single line in the Koran that condemns suicide, because the ambiguous statement is set in a thicket of other passages that can be read only as direct summons to war against the “friends of Satan.”  The appropriate response to the bin Ladens of the world is to correct everyone’s reading of these texts by making the same evidentiary demands in religious matters that we make in all others.  If we cannot find our way to a time when most of us are willing to admit that, at the very least, we are not sure whether or not God wrote some of our books, then we need only count the days to Armageddon – because God has given us far many more reasons to kill one another than to turn the other cheek.

sam harris

Source: The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, Pages: 34..5

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Elysha on accountability, advaita, adyashanti, apocalypse, authenticity, awakening, awareness, beauty, behaviour, being, bible, biology, bliss, buddha, buddhism, catholic, cessation, changes, christ, christian, clarity, communication, concepts

As you learn to leave alone the activity of unconsciously trying to be the mindbody that you think that you are - the mindbody that this "you" is currently flowing through - and you learn to move as this one that you truly are - this "you" of you; the very heart of existence - steadily, consciously and momentarily, the continuity of the ever deepening of this innermost as it keeps on entering its manifestation, through this mindbody that you find yourself flowing through, allows you to simply bubble in the sheer joy, pleasure, peace, delightfulness and stillness that this "you" of you is.

Elysha

Source: http://www.elysha.org

Contributed by: elysha

A Quote by Evelyn Y on peter, bible, hope, reason, answers, prepared, and prepare

Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you the reason for the HOPE that you have.

Evelyn Y

Source: 1 Peter 3:15 NIV

Contributed by: Evelyn

A Quote by Matthews 25:40 on food, for, poor, bible, matthew, gospel, jesus, and god

"As often as you did it to one of the least of My brothers and sisters, you did it to Me."

Matthews 25:40

Source: Matthew 25:40

Contributed by: Food For The Poor

A Quote by Daniel Pinchbeck on daniel pinchbeck, 2012, job, yaweh, jung, shadow, antimony, book of job, old testament, bible, and projection

In the book of Job written several centuries before the New Testament, Yaweh subject his “faithful servant,” Job,  to a harrowing series of tests, after excepting a wager from Satan that Job’s faith can be broken.  “Job is no more the outward occasion for an inward process of dialectic in God,” wrote Jung.  Like a scientist performing some cruel experiment on bacilli in a test tube, Yaweh kills Job’s family, removes his land, riddles him with disease, and inflicts every imaginable form of ruin upon him.  Job, however, remains steadfast.  At the same time, he is determined to understand the reason for his plight.  According to Jung, Job is the first man to comprehend the split inside Yaweh – that the God-image is an antimony, comprising both the dark god of cruelty and the benevolent deity of love and justice;  “in light of this realization his knowledge attains a divine numinosity.”  Confronted by archetypal injustice, Job insists on equalizing compassion, and eventually receives it, as his status in the world is restored.

Despite his overpowering might, the creator fears the judgment of his creature.  “Yaweh projects onto Job a skeptic’s face which is hateful to him because it is his own, and which gazes at him with an uncanny and critical eye,” Jung noted.  From the perspective of the God-image, Job had attained a higher state of knowledge than Yaweh through his trvails, and this required a compensatory sacrifice, enacted, a few hundred years later, through the incarnation of Christ.

Jung realized that God intended to fully incarnate in the collective body of humanity, and that this time was quickly approaching.  From his psychoanalytic and personal work and theoretical musings, he proposed that the Christian Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost was unfolding into a “quaternity,” adding a fourth element that had been suppressed from the Western psyche.  “The enigma of squaring the circle” was one representation of this quaternity, “an age-old and presumably pre-historic symbol, always associated with the idea of a world-creating deity.”  This aspect of divinity, now returning and requiring assimilation into consciousness, was the Devil, who had been dissociated from the Western psyche at the beginning of the Judeo-Christian aeon.  Along with the Devil, the fourth element also represented natural wisdom, personified by the Gnosticc deity Sophia, long exiled and excised from the canonical texts.

Since the creator is an antimony, a totality of inner opposites, his creatures reflect this schism.  To descend into humanity, God must choose “the creaturely man filled with darkness – the natural man who is tainted with original sin,” Jung wrote.  “The guilty man is eminently suitable and is therefore chosen to become the vessel for the continuing incarnation, not the guiltless one who holds aloof from the world, and refuses to pay his tribute to life, for in him the dark God would find no room.”  The uniting of opposites, the reconciliation of dark and light contained in the God-image, can only take place within the consciously realized “guilty man,” not the sanctimonious, ascetic, or self-righteous one – anyone who denies their shadow will only project it in some new form.

Daniel Pinchbeck

Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 345

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Walter Russell on mystic, genius, cosmic, consciousness, mind, god, bible, center, omniscience, inspiration, knowledge, cosmoc, illumination, jesus, light, spirit, mankind, goal, journey, and man

Beyond the genius is the mystic.
The mystic is one who has attained cosmic consciousness by a complete severance of the seats of consciousness and sensation. He is then almost totally unaware of his body and is totally aware of the Light of God centering him. Omniscience comes to him in that timeless blinding flash of light which is characteristic of a complete severance. This experience was described in the illumination of St. Paul. Every timeless flash of intense inspiration which comes to any man is a partial illumination, for inspiration is the manner in which new knowledge comes to man from the cosmos.
Of all mystics, Jesus was the outstanding example of all time. He was the only One in all history to have known complete cosmic-conscious unity with God.
The Bible refers to cosmic-conscious experience as “the illumination” or “being in the Light” or “in the Spirit.”
In all history less than forty cases of partial cosmic consciousness are known, and probably not more that three of these anywhere nearly approached the complete state of illumination experienced by the Nazarene.
Cosmic Consciousness is the ultimate goal of all mankind. All will know it before the long journey of man is finished, but there are many in this new age just dawning who are ready for it in part, if not fully.
Many desire it fully, but it is best that it come bit by bit for the complete severance is very dangerous. The ecstasy of this supreme experience is so great that one does not wish to come back. The power of severance of soul from body is within easy accomplishment, but to step back into the body is very difficult.

Walter Russell

Source: The Secret of Light

Contributed by: esaruoho

A Quote by Isaac Asimov on bible, religion, atheism, dogma, and christianity

The Bible, properly read, is the most potent force for atheism yet invented.

Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992)

Source: Unknown

Contributed by: CajunGypsy

A Quote by The Bible on bible and proverb

He who pursue righteousness and love, finds life, properity, and honor.

The Bible

Source: Bible, Proverb 21:21

Contributed by: Yen

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