baseball

A Quote by Letty Cottin Pogrebin on family, nest, fruit, boat, possibilities, sport, game, human history, building, baseball, canoe, and orange

If the family were a container, it would be a nest, an enduring nest, loosely woven, expansive, and open. If the family were a fruit, it would be an orange, a circle of sections, held together but separable—each segment distinct. If the family were a boat, it would be a canoe that makes no progress unless everyone paddles. If the family were a sport, it would be baseball: a long, slow, nonviolent game that is never over until the last out. If the family were a building, it would be an old but solid structure that contains human history, and appeals to those who see the carved moldings under all the plaster, the wide plank floors under the linoleum, the possibilities.

Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Source: Family and Politics, ch. 2 (1983).

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Babe Zaharias on baseball, women, sports, and effort

It's not enough to swing at the ball. You've got to loosen your girdle and really let the ball have it!

Babe Zaharias

Contributed by: Mystery

A Quote by William Dean on assumptions, baseball, brothers, christianity, complaints, difficulty, evil, facts, fatherhood, faults, integrity, justice, learning, life, meaning, nature, needs, reflection, sons, theology, trade, and words

Bernard Loomer's father was a sea captain. He was acquainted with his small place in an uncontrollable nature. In a talk in 1974 Loomer described his father's instructions about the uses of a baseball glove. The father had just overheard his son's sandlot complaints about the thinness of a glove inherited from his older brothers. When his father asked him what a baseball glove was for, young Loomer had said that it was to protect the hand. In the words of Bernard Loomer in his sixties, his father replied: Son, I never have played baseball, but it seems to me you ought to be able to catch the ball bare-handed. The way I look at it, you use a glove not to protect your hand, but to give you a bigger hand to help catch balls that are more difficult to reach. I assume that in this as in all walks of life there are tricks to the trade. I suggest you learn how to catch with that glove for two reasons. First, because you are not going to get another one, and second, because you don't need protection from life. You need a glove to give you a bigger hand to catch baseballs you might otherwise miss. As the decade of the 1970s progressed, Loomer reflected increasingly on the fact that what you might otherwise miss [in theology] was irrational, even evil, but [that it] must be caught anyway. Loomer grew increasingly dissatisfied with those who seemed to restrict their reach-even Whitehead was faulted. And increasingly it appeared that Christian theology was the theology Loomer had-that he was not going to get another one-and so, although it was thin in places, he attempted to use the one theology he had, to catch all he could. [This] suggests the meaning of Loomer's special term, "size." Size signifies "the volume of life you can take into your being and still maintain your integrity."

William Dean

Source: The Size of God, 1987

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Vida Blue on baseball, love, money, and niceness

Sure, it's nice to win. But there's only one thing that's important to me and that's the money we're going to get, win or lose. . . . I don't love baseball, I like it. And to me, baseball means money, and that's all I care about.

Vida Blue

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on appreciation, baseball, life, and sacrifice

Baseball is the only place in life where a sacrifice is really appreciated.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on baseball and life

In the great department store of life, baseball is the toy department.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on baseball, beginning, and heart

Baseball breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face fall alone.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on accuracy, baseball, books, day, difficulty, enthusiasm, errors, god, individuality, life, losing, motivation, people, separation, statistics, and success

In baseball we keep an accurate record of the hits, runs, and errors of each individual player. Life is also a great game, and in life the statistics are much more important than they are in a ball game. One of our human weaknesses in life is that when we are losing the game, we don't always like to keep track of the score. Certainly we are not very enthusiastic about putting the errors down on the paper, and most people don't even know what their individual batting average is. This makes our success much more difficult both to figure out and to attain . . . we cannot separate our success from our statistics. If each day we could see what God writes in his book about our works for that day, it would certainly motivate us to make better scores.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Told by Sterling W. Sill in Majesty of Books, p. 34

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sparky Anderson on baseball, force, good, justice, managers, mind, respect, rules, simplicity, success, and talent

Baseball is a simple game. If you have good players, and you keep them in the right frame of mind, the manager is a success. The players make the manager. It's never the other way. Managing is not running, hitting, or stealing. Managing is getting your players to put out one hundred percent year after year. A player does not have to like a manager and he does not have to respect a manager. All he has to do is obey the rules. Talent is one thing. Being able to go from spring to October is another. You just got caught in a position where you have no position. [Explaining why he was forced to cut a utility player]

Sparky Anderson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sinclair Lewis on baseball and eternity

A sensational event was changing from the brown suit to the gray the contents of his pockets. He was earnest about these objects. They were of eternal importance, like baseball or the Republican Party.

Sinclair Lewis (1885 - 1951)

Source: Babbitt, 1922, ch. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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