babies

A Quote by Pink Floyd on babies and fear

Hush now baby and don't you cry Mama's gonna make all of your Nightmares come true Mama's gonna put all of her fears into you

Pink Floyd

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on babies, citizenship, death, delusion, immortality, innocence, life, questions, rudeness, seduction, simplicity, women, wonder, and world

The great physician, Dr. Henry G. Armitage, Jr., states, "Not without comment shall it come to pass that a state (so fretful for the preservation of the praying mantis but holding an unborn baby to be of no account) can send a spark of immortality swinging out into limbo and conspire with citizen and physician to turn a fragile, living object of simple innocence and complex wonder into a pathetic pulp and consign it by rude and peremptory passage to the furnace or sewer - unknown, unwanted [and] undefended." He further questions how a woman as "the fertile adornment of our race can be deluded into the notion that she is a mere poetress of unwanted luggage or be by blandishment seduced into believing that she has dominion over life not her own." He says, "An abortion is never commonplace, for the world holds no heartbreak like the death of innocence."

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Morality, p. 151, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on babies, darkness, deed, facts, life, potential, and words

When we don't like to face up to hard facts, we use soft words. We do not speak about killing a baby within the womb, but about "termination of potential life." Words are often multiplied to try to cover dark deeds.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Things As They Really Are, p. 55, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on america, babies, concern, and reason

If the nearly one-and-a-half million babies aborted in America each year could, somehow, vote, chameleon candidates would find fresh reason to be concerned about abortion, whereas now they are unconcerned.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: personal notes, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Natalie Wood on babies, success, time, and women

The only time a woman can really succeed in changing a man is when he is a baby.

Natalie Wood

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Cal Thomas on acceptance, america, audiences, babies, blindness, boldness, children, concern, country, criticism, death, decisions, dignity, generosity, good, heart, hunger, inclusion, life, love, motherhood, murder, nations, nobility, peace,

Mother Teresa Has Anti-Abortion Answer At a National Prayer Breakfast in Washington Feb. 3, Mother Teresa of Calcutta delivered the most startling and bold proclamation of truth to power I have heard in my more than 30 professional years in Washington. Before an audience of 3,000 - that included the president and his wife, the vice president and his wife and congressional leaders, among others - the 83-year old nun, who is physically frail but spiritually and rhetorically powerful, delivered an address that cut to the heart of the social ills afflicting America. She said that America, once known for generosity to the world, has become selfish. And she said that the greatest proof of that selfishness is abortion. Tying abortion to growing violence and murder in the streets, she said, "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? . . . Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want." At that line, most of those in attendance erupted in a standing ovation, something that rarely occurs at these sedate events. At that moment, President Clinton quickly reached for his water glass, and Mrs. Clinton and Vice President and Mrs. Gore stared without expression at Mother Teresa. They did not applaud. It was clearly an uncomfortable moment on the dais. She then delivered the knockout punch: "Many people are very, very concerned with children in India, with the children of Africa where quite a few die of hunger, and so on. Many people are also concerned about all the violence in this great country of the United States. "These concerns are very good. But often these same people are not concerned with the millions who are being killed by the deliberate decision of their own mothers. And this is what is the greatest destroyer of peace today - abortion, which brings people to such blindness." What? Abortion destroys peace and causes blindness toward the sick, the hungry and the naked? Abortion leads to wars between nations? Of course it does, if life is regarded so lightly and its disposal becomes so trivial, so clinical and so easy. Why should people or nations regard human life as noble or dignified if abortion flourishes? Why agonize about indiscriminate death in Bosnia when babies are being killed far more efficiently and out of the sight of television cameras? Mother Teresa delivered her address without rhetorical flourishes. She never raised her voice or pounded the lectern. Her power was in her words and the selfless life she has led. Even President Clinton, in his remarks that followed, acknowledged she was beyond criticism because of the life she has lived in service to others. At the end, she pleaded for pregnant women who don't want their children to give them to her: "I am willing to accept any child who would be aborted and to give that child to a married couple who will love the child and be loved by the child." She said she has placed over 3,000 children in adoptive homes from her Calcutta headquarters alone. She has answered the question, "Who will care for all of these babies if abortion is again outlawed?" Now the question is whether a woman contemplating abortion wishes to be selfish or selfless, to take life or to give life.

Cal Thomas

Source: Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 14, 1994

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on angels and babies

A baby is an angel whose wings decrease as his legs increase.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

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A Quote by Marion D. Hanks on acceptance, babies, birth, certainty, college, creation, divinity, education, embarrassment, facts, failure, family, future, graduation, husbands, laws, learning, life, men, nobility, parenthood, poetry, potential, preparati

There is a story of a certain college student in a poetry class who, when called upon to recite lines that he had written by assignment, refused. He was prepared to accept failure rather than the embarrassment of facing the class, inept as he felt he was in this field. The professor, it is reported, said to him, "Young man, it is important that you realize that you arc not a finished product. You are still in the process of creation." In fact, all of us are in the process of creation. "Progress," said Browning in "Paracelsus," "is the law of life. Man is not man as yet." But men do have a divine heritage and we are here for noble purposes. We have an infinitely important future potential if, if we learn. How is it going to happen? Will it be automatic? You who are married, did the ceremony create you or qualify you as properly equipped husbands and wives? Does the birth of a baby into the family qualify you as adequate parents? Does graduation signify that we are educated ?

Marion D. Hanks (1921 -)

Source: at BYU, May 28, 1964 © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Margie Haynes on babies

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I didn't think that having a baby after I'd turned forty was so bad-only that I had to hold her at arm's length to look at her.

Margie Haynes

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A Quote by Mae West on angels, babies, beginning, kiss, and love

Tira begins to sing "I'm No Angel" to him as the screen fades: Baby, I can warm you with this love of mine. I'm No Angel. Aw, let me feel my fingers running through your hair, I can give you kisses. . . .

Mae West (1892 - 1980)

Source: I'm No Angel, 1933.

Contributed by: Zaady

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