awareness

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, buddhism, caring, day, life, nature, needs, planning, struggle, study, superiority, teachers, truth, understanding, and elightenment

To find a buddha all you have to do is see your nature. Your nature is the buddha. And the buddha is the person who's free: free of plans, free of cares. If you don't see your nature and run around all day looking somewhere else, you'll never find a buddha. The truth is, there's nothing to find. But to reach such an understanding you need a teacher and you need to struggle to make yourself understand. . . . If you don't find a teacher soon, you'll live this life in vain. It's true, you have the buddha-nature. But without the help of a teacher you'll never know it. Only one person in a million becomes enlightened without a teacher's help. If, though, by the conjunction of conditions, someone understands what the Buddha meant, that person doesn't need a teacher. Such a person has a natural awareness superior to anything taught. But unless you're so blessed, study hard, and by means of instruction you'll understand.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 13-15

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on acceptance, awareness, buddhism, life, and mortality

To go from mortal to buddha, you have to put an end to karma, nurture your awareness, and accept what life brings.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 35

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, delusion, and world

When we're deluded there's a world to escape. When we're aware, there's nothing to escape.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 51

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, buddhism, delusion, effort, emptiness, meaning, mind, present, and understanding

To invoke the Buddha's name you have to understand the dharma of invoking. If it's not present in your mind, your mouth chants an empty name. As long as you're troubled by the three poisons or by thoughts of yourself, your deluded mind will keep you form seeing the Buddha and you'll only waste your effort. Chanting and invoking are worlds apart. Chanting is done with the mouth. Invoking is done with the mind. And because invoking comes from the mind, it's called the door to awareness. Chanting is centered in the mouth and appears as sound. If you cling to appearances while searching for meaning, you won't find a thing. . . .

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 111

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, buddhism, delusion, emptiness, lies, mind, reality, thinking, words, and zen

Not thinking about anything is zen. Once you know this, walking, standing, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is zen. To know that the mind is empty is to see the buddha. . . . Using the mind to reality is delusion. Not using the mind to look for reality is awareness. Freeing oneself from words is liberation.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 49

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, knowledge, mind, nature, and needs

If you see your nature, you don't need to read sutras or invoke buddhas. Erudition and knowledge are not only useless but also cloud your awareness. Doctrines are only for pointing to the mind. Once you see your mind, why pay attention to doctrines?

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 35

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on awareness, buddhism, fortune, freedom, good, heaven, hell, kindness, mortality, and power

A buddha is someone who finds freedom in good fortune and bad. Such is his power that karma can't hold him. No matter what kind of karma, a buddha transforms it. Heaven and hell are nothing to him. But the awareness of a mortal is dim compared to that of a buddha, who penetrates everything, inside and out.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 31-33

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Billie Jean King on awareness and self-awareness

I think self-awareness is probably the most important thing towards being a champion.

Billie Jean King (1943 -)

Source: The Sportswoman, by Marlene Jensen, December 1973.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill Lee on awareness, belief, body, change, death, difficulty, love, mortality, potential, reality, and universe

During those moments on the pitching rubber, when you have every pitch at your command working to its highest potential, you are your own universe. For hours after the game, this sense of completeness lingers. Then you sink back to what we humorously refer to as reality. Your body aches and your muscles cry out. You feel your mortality. That can be a difficult thing to handle. I believe pitchers come in touch with death a lot sooner than other players. We are more aware of the subtle changes taking place in our body and are unable to overlook the tell-tale hints that we are not going to last on this planet forever. Every pitcher has to be a little bit in love with death. There's a subconscious fatalism there.

Bill Lee

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on awareness, education, facts, future, greatness, individuality, intelligence, knowledge, life, mind, organize, past, people, power, religion, present, time, value, and wishes

If I had the power to organize higher education as I should wish it to be, I should seek to substitute for the old orthodox religions - which appeal to few among the young, and those as a rule the least intelligent and the most obscurantist - something which is perhaps hardly to be called religion, since it is merely a focusing of attention upon well-ascertained facts. I should seek to make young people vividly aware of the past, vividly realizing that the future of man will in all likelihood be immeasurably longer than his past, profoundly conscious of the minuteness of the planet upon which we live and of the fact that life on this planet is only a temporary incident; and at the same time with these facts which tend to emphasize the insignificance of the individual, I should present quite another set of facts designed to impress upon the mind of the young the greatness of which the individual is capable, and the knowledge that throughout all the depths of stellar space nothing of equal value is known to us. . . .

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Conquest of Happiness

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content