awards

A Quote by William G. Simms on awards, criticism, discrimination, duty, and praise

Neither praise nor blame is the object of true criticism. Justly to discriminate, firmly to establish, wisely to prescribe and honestly to award - these are the true aims and duties of criticism.

William G. Simms (1806 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Orson Scott Card on awards, books, character, control, heart, hope, life, memory, mind, needs, world, and worth

But I hope that in the lives of [the characters], you will find stories worth holding in your memory, perhaps even in your heart. That's the transaction that counts more than best-seller lists, royalty statements, awards, or reviews. Because in the pages of this book, you and I will meet one-on-one, my mind and yours, and you will enter a world of my making and dwell there, not as a character that I control, but as a person with a mind of your own. You will make of my story what you need it to be, if you can. I hope my tale is true enough and flexible enough that you can make it into a world worth living in.

Orson Scott Card

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Norman H. Hansen on awards, garden, learning, nature, peace, reward, satisfaction, spirit, teachers, understanding, and path

Seek to understand what draws you to the garden. You may discover greater rewards than the blue ribbons awarded for the biggest pumpkin or the best preserves. You may find the garden becomes a teacher and crop "failures" become lessons learned. However big or small your garden is, if you allow nature to touch your spirit, gardening will bring returns of peace, satisfaction, and well-being for as long as you continue to wander the garden path.

Norman H. Hansen

Source: The Worth of Gardening

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on adversity, awards, greatness, nobility, security, soul, time, and words

The prince who relies upon their words, without having otherwise provided for his security, is ruined; for friendships that are won by awards, and not by greatness and nobility of soul, although deserved, yet are not real, and cannot be depended upon in time of adversity.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lizzy Gardiner on awards, gold, insults, and justice

Wore a dress made of American Express gold cards to the Academy Awards. I was looking for an American symbol. A Coca-Cola bottle or a Mickey Mouse would have been ridiculous, doing anything with the American flag would have been insulting, and Cadillac hub caps were just too uncomfortable.

Lizzy Gardiner

Source: 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Keller on art, awards, funerals, museums, painting, time, and work

The Metropolitan Museum of Art some time ago held a display of contemporary art at which $52,000 was awarded to American sculptors, painters, and artists in allied fields. The award for the best painting went to the canvas of an Illinois artist. It was described as "a macabre, detailed work showing a closed door bearing a funeral wreath." Equally striking was the work's title: "That which I should have done, I did not do."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jack Benny on awards

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I don't deserve this award, but I have arthritis and I don't deserve that either.

Jack Benny (1894 - 1974)

Source: upon receiving an award

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daniel D. Mich on awards, brothers, needs, publicity, and time

I look to a time when brotherhood needs no publicity, to a time when a brotherhood award would be as ridiculous as an award for getting up each morning.

Daniel D. Mich

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Percy Snow on atoms, authority, awards, clarity, direction, doubt, existence, good, history, laws, listening, mathematics, physics, proof, purity, satisfaction, scientists, simplicity, style, theory, thought, time, unity, and work

Einstein, twenty-six years old, only three years away from crude privation, still a patent examiner, published in the Annalen der Physik in 1905 five papers on entirely different subjects. Three of them were among the greatest in the history of physics. One, very simple, gave the quantum explanation of the photoelectric effect-it was this work for which, sixteen years later he was awarded the Nobel prize. Another dealt with the phenomenon of Brownian motion, the apparently erratic movement of tiny particles suspended in a liquid: Einstein showed that these movements satisfied a clear statistical law. This was like a conjuring trick, easy when explained: before it, decent scientists could still doubt the concrete existence of atoms and molecules: this paper was as near direct proof of their concreteness as a theoretician could give. The third paper was the special theory of relativity, which quietly amalgamated space, time and matter into one fundamental unity. This last paper contains no references and quotes no authority. All of them are written in a style unlike any other theoretical physicist's. They contain very little mathematics. There is a good deal of verbal commentary. The conclusions, the bizarre conclusions, emerge as though with the greatest of ease: the reasoning is unbreakable. It looks as though he had reached the conclusions by pure thought, unaided, without listening to the opinions of others. To a surprisingly large extent, that is precisely what he had done. It is pretty safe to say that, so long as physics lasts, no one will again hack out three major breakthroughs in one year.

Charles Percy Snow (1905 - 1980)

Source: C.P. Snow, Variety of Men, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, U.K. 1969, pp 85-86.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on awards, buddhism, pleasure, religion, and understanding

NIRVANA, n. In the Buddhist religion, a state of pleasurable annihilation awarded to the wise, particularly to those wise enough to understand it.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

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