automobiles

A Quote by Steven Wright on automobiles, home, and machines

I have an answering machine in my car. It says, "I'm home now. But leave a message and I'll call when I'm out"

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on automobiles and people

I hooked up my accelerator pedal in my car to my brake lights. I hit the gas, people behind me stop, and I'm gone.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on automobiles and play

I play the harmonica. The only way I can play is if I get my car going really fast, and stick it out the window. The harmonica sounds 'amazing.'

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on automobiles and justice

For a while I didn't have a car . . . I had a helicopter . . . no place to park it, so I just tied it to a lamp post and left it running. [slow glance upward]

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Russell Baker on automobiles, efficiency, and needs

Is fuel efficiency really what we need most desperately? I say that what we really need is a car that can be shot when it breaks down.

Russell Baker

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robertson Davies on automobiles, evil, good, ideas, life, luck, and rest

In India it is regarded as a good idea to dart in front of an oncoming car, for the car is sure to kill the evil spirits who are pursuing you, and all the rest of your life you will have good luck.

Robertson Davies (1913 - 1995)

Source: The Table Talk of Samuel Marchbanks

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A Quote by Robert X. Cringely on automobiles and computers

If the automobile had followed the same development cycle as the computer, a Rolls-Royce would today cost $100, get a million miles per gallon, and explode once a year, killing everyone inside.

Robert X. Cringely

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert L. Simpson on automobiles, belief, day, experience, fatherhood, heart, leadership, learning, men, needs, people, value, work, and world

I believe with all my heart that the true value of a man is not in the man who can do the work of ten men, but rather in that man who can get ten men to work. I think this is where Heavenly Father recognizes the great value of a leader, not particularly in the man who can do the work of ten, but the man who can get ten men to respond and to do what needs to be done. I remember the story of the assembly line. There was a man back in Detroit putting hub caps on new automobiles. He became the best man on the line. He had been putting hub caps on for ten years. One day the boss came by and said, "How are things going?" "Well, I am glad you dropped by. I think I deserve a raise. I am the best man on this line. Do you realize I have ten years' experience putting hub caps on?" The boss smiled and said, "No, George. You have one year's experience ten times. It doesn't take ten years' experience to learn how to put on a hub cap." Young people, think about that for a moment. If you find yourself down in a rut putting on hub caps, and you think you have got ten years' experience, you get out of that rut, and you reach out into other areas. You learn how to do new things, and you become useful in this world that we live in.

Robert L. Simpson (1915 -)

Source: at BYU, April 20, 1965., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert J. Kleinhenz on automobiles, beginning, camping, journeys, mountains, obstacles, struggle, and trying

When asked what it was like to set about proving something, the mathematician likened proving a theorem to seeing the peak of a mountain and trying to climb to the top. One establishes a base camp and begins scaling the mountain's sheer face, encountering obstacles at every turn, often retracing one's steps and struggling every foot of the journey. Finally when the top is reached, one stands examining the peak, taking in the view of the surrounding countrysideand then noting the automobile road up the other side!

Robert J. Kleinhenz

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Fulghum on automobiles, driving, fatherhood, motherhood, perception, privacy, secrets, talent, and teaching

When my father finally got around to teaching me to drive, he was impressed at my "natural" talent for driving, not knowing that I had already been secretly driving my mother's car around the neighborhood. When I took the test and got my license and my father gave me my own set of keys to the car one night at dinner, it was a major rite of passage for him and my mother. Their perception of me had changed and was formally acknowledged. For me the occasion meant a private sanction to do in public what I had already been doing in secret.

Robert Fulghum (1937 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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