authors

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on authors

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Not pickt from the leaves of any author, but bred amongst the weeds and tares of mine own brain.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici

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A Quote by Sir James Matthew Barrie on authors, certainty, execution, and good

Times have changed since a certain author was executed for murdering his publisher. They say that when the author was on the scaffold he said good-bye to the minister and to the reporters, and then he saw some publishers sitting in the front row below, and to them he did not say good-bye. He said instead, "I'll see you again."

Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860 - 1937)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Isaac Newton on authors, laws, mathematics, and nature

The latest authors, like the most ancient, strove to subordinate the phenomena of nature to the laws of mathematics.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Simone Weil on art, authors, and work

A work of art has an author and yet, when it is perfect, it has something which is anonymous about it.

Simone Weil (1909 - 1943)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on authors and good

I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Samuel Taylor Coleridge on authors, country, good, and heart

Why are not more gems from our great authors scattered over the country . . . .Let every bookworm, when in any fragrant, scarce, old tome he discovers a sentence, a story, an illustration, that does his heart good, hasten to give it.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Smiles on authors and time

Time is of no account with great thoughts. They are as fresh today as when they first passed through their author's minds, ages ago.

Samuel Smiles (1812 - 1904)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on acting, authors, nature, and stupidity

Sherry is dull, naturally dull; but it must have taken him a great deal of pains to become what we now see him. Such an access of stupidity, sir, is not in Nature. Of Thomas Sheridan (1719-1788), actor, lecturer, and author:

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Life of Johnson (Boswell). Vol. ii. Chap. ix.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on abuse, authors, danger, service, and silence

Abuse is often of service. There is nothing so dangerous to an author as silence. His name, like the shuttlecock, must be beat backward and forward, or it falls to the ground.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Contributed by: Zaady

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