authority

A Quote by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. on knowledge, authority, integrity, and horseshit

Everything I say is complete horseshit...

Kurt Vonnegut (1922 -)

Contributed by: Paul

A Quote by Mitch on corporate, agree, authority, and implement

In certain corporate situations, you may find that people too often agree to things that they don’t have the authority to implement.

Mitch Thrower

Source: "The Attention Deficit Workplace" by Mitch Thrower

Contributed by: Mitch

A Quote by Mitch on meet, introduction, people, and authority

Remember that the people you want to meet are just people and people need to eat, go tot the gym, and speak at conferences.

Mitch Thrower

Source: "The Attention Deficit Workplace" by Mitch Thrower

Contributed by: Mitch

A Quote by Joe Strummer on joe strummer, strummer, clash, the clash, westway to the world, authority, and power

"Authority is supposedly grounded in wisdom, but I could see from a very early age that authority was only a system of control and it didn't have any inherent wisdom. I quickly realised that you either became a power or you were crushed."

Joe Strummer

Source: Joe Strummer

Contributed by: Steve

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on authority, elderly, people, youth, and elightenment

Elderly people and those in authority cannot always be relied upon to take enlightened and comprehending views of what they call the indiscretions of youth.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: A Churchill Reader, edited by Colin Coote

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, anger, authority, brevity, and heaven

Man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, As make the angels weep.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MEASURE FOR MEASURE, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on authority, failure, and power

Where Example keeps pace with Authority, Power hardly fails to be obey'd.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William F. Buckley, Jr. on ancestry, authority, effort, god, liberals, life, nations, obedience, politics, power, voting, and wisdom

I will not cede more power to the state. I will not willingly cede more power to anyone, not to the state, not to General Motors, not to the CIO. I will hoard my power like a miser, resisting every effort to drain it away from me. I will then use my power, as I see fit. I mean to live my life an obedient man, but obedient to God, subservient to the wisdom of my ancestors; never to the authority of political truths arived at yesterday at the voting booth. That is a program of sorts, is it not? It is certainly program enough to keep conservatives busy, and Liberals at bay. And the nation free.

William F. Buckley (1925 -)

Source: the end of his 1959 book, Up from Liberalism

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on art, authority, idealism, life, and people

No art can conquer the people alone-the people are conquered by an ideal of life upheld by authority.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Bateson on argument, authority, commitment, courage, debate, encouragement, evolution, facts, failure, faith, familiarity, imagination, irony, popularity, power, research, simplicity, theory, and value

Empirical confirmation of Darwin's theory did not prove forthcoming in the first few decades following its publication. Indeed, by the early twentieth century, many noted naturalists had come to regard Darwin's account of evolution by natural selection as a theoretical failure. Some even described their continuing commitment to evolution as a matter of faith, rather an ironic justification in light of the impending Scopes trial of 1925. "I suppose that everyone is familiar in outline with the theory of the origin of species which Darwin promulgated. Through the last fifty years this theme of the natural selection of favored races has been developed and expounded in writings innumerable. Favored races certainly can replace others. The argument is sound, but we are doubtful of its value. For us that debate stands adjourned. We go to Darwin for his incomparable collection of facts. We would fain emulate his scholarship, his width and his power of exposition, but to us he speaks no more with philosophical authority. We read his scheme of evolution as we would those of Leucretius or of Lamarck, delighting in their simplicity and courage." "Modern research lends not the smallest encouragement or sanction to the view that gradual evolution occurs by the transformation of masses of individuals, though that fancy has fixed itself on popular imagination."

William Bateson (1861 - 1926)

Source: Address of the President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, August 14, 1914

Contributed by: Zaady

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