army

A Quote by Gloria Steinem on army, behavior, jokes, weapons, and women

Any woman who chooses to behave like a full human being should be warned that the armies of the status quo will treat her as something of a dirty joke; that's their natural and first weapon.

Gloria Steinem (1934 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on admiration, army, fidelity, kindness, patience, rest, soldiers, and suffering

One of George Washington's main concerns was to make sure that his soldiers had adequate supplies of meat: A part of the army has been a week without any kind of flesh, and the rest three or four days. Naked and starving as they are, we cannot enough admire the incomparable patience and fidelity of the soldiery, that they have not been ere this excited by their suffering to a general mutiny and dispersion.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

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A Quote by George Washington on army, blessings, fashion, foolishness, heaven, hope, insults, men, order, practice, reflection, and vices

When it was reported to General Washington that the army was frequently indulging in swearing, he immediately sent out the following order: The general is sorry to be informed that the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing - a vice little known heretofore in the American army - is growing into fashion. Let the men and officers reflect "that we can not hope for the blessing of heaven on our army if we insult it by our impiety and folly."

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Source: ALBERT W. DAW COLLECTION

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A Quote by George Washington on army, discipline, service, and superiority

Nothing is more harmful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army superiority over another.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

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A Quote by George Washington on army, discipline, soul, success, and weakness

Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable, procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

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A Quote by George Meredith on army, darkness, heaven, and laws

On a starred night Prince Lucifer uprose, Tired of his dark dominion swung the fiend . . . He reached a middle height, and at the stars, Which are the brain of heaven, he looked, and sank. Around the ancient track marched, rank on rank, The army of unalterable law.

George Meredith (1828 - 1909)

Source: Lucifer in Starlight

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A Quote by George Brinton McClellan on army and labor

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Lincoln tells McClellan, ". . . the supreme command of the Army will entail a vast labor upon you." McClellan responds, "I can do it all."

George McClellan (1826 - 1885)

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A Quote by George Herbert on army, confidence, and skill

Skill and confidence are an unconquered army.

George Herbert (1593 - 1633)

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emile De Girardin on army, change, defeat, power, victory, and words

The power of words is immense. A well-chosen word has often sufficed to stop a flying army, to change defeat into victory and to save an empire.

Emile De Girardin

Contributed by: Zaady

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