army

A Quote by Victor Marie Hugo on army, ideas, and time

An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come.

Victor Marie Hugo (1802 - 1885)

Source: The Future of Man

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victor Marie Hugo on army and ideas

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A stand can be made against invasion by an army; no stand can be made against invasion by an idea.

Victor Marie Hugo (1802 - 1885)

Source: Histoire d'un Crime

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victor Marie Hugo on army, ideas, time, and world

There is one thing stronger than all the armies in the world: and that is an idea whose time has come.

Victor Marie Hugo (1802 - 1885)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victor Marie Hugo on army, ideas, time, and world

Nothing else in the world . . . not all the armies . . . is so powerful as an idea whose time has come.

Victor Marie Hugo (1802 - 1885)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ulysses S. Grant on america, army, day, desires, indifference, injustice, justice, nations, neighbors, and war

In his later reminiscences, Ulysses S. Grant roundly condemned the Mexican War in which he had served, and even saw the Civil War as a sort of karmic retribution for America's sins against its southern neighbor: "Generally the officers of the army were indifferent whether the annexation [of Texas] was consummated or not; but not so all of them. For myself, I was bitterly opposed to the measure, and to this day regard the war, which resulted, as one of the most unjust ever waged by a stronger against a weaker nation. It was an instance of a republic following the bad example of European monarchies, in not considering justice in their desire to acquire additional territory."

Ulysses S. Grant (1822 - 1885)

Source: Personal Memoirs, 1885

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on army, faith, and laws

Upon the glazen shelves kept watch Matthew and Waldo, guardians of the faith The army of unalterable law.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: Cousin Nancy, 1917

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A Quote by Thomas Andrew (Tom) Lehrer on ability, army, colors, discrimination, idealism, and logic

The Army has carried the American . . . ideal to its logical conclusion. Not only do they prohibit discrimination on the grounds of race, creed and color, but also on ability.

Tom Lehrer (1928 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Vernor Smith on anxiety, army, belief, bitterness, chance, day, death, disaster, dreams, endurance, foolishness, freedom, friendship, glory, government, heart, hope, ignorance, laughter, life, losing, patience, peace, people, pity, powe

No man made great by death offers more hope to lowly pride than does Abraham Lincoln; for while living he was himself so simple as often to be dubbed a fool. Foolish he was, they said, in losing his youthful heart to a grave and living his life on married patience; foolish in pitting his homely ignorance against Douglas, brilliant, courtly, and urbane; foolish in setting himself to do the right in a world where the day goes mostly to the strong; foolish in dreaming of freedom for a long-suffering folk whom the North is as anxious to keep out as the South was to keep down; foolish in choosing the silent Grant to lead to victory the hesitant armies of the North; foolish, finally, in presuming that government for the people must be government of the people and by the people. Foolish many said; foolish many, many believed. This Lincoln, whom so many living friends and foes alike deemed foolish, hid his bitterness in laughter; fed his sympathy on solitude; and met recurring disaster with whimsicality to muffle the murmur of a bleeding heart. Out of the tragic sense of life he pitied where others blamed; bowed his own shoulders with the woes of the weak; endured humanely his little day of chance power; and won through death what life disdains to bestow upon such simple souls - lasting peace and everlasting glory.

Thomas Vernor Smith

Source: Illinois Senate, Feb 12,’35, Lincoln's 126th birthday —Smith, Lincoln, Living Legend, pp. 3-5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Paine on army, conflict, country, crisis, earth, freedom, god, heaven, hell, love, men, patriotism, power, service, slavery, soldiers, soul, tyranny, value, and women

These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we may obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: 't is dearness only that gives everything its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods. It would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as Freedom should not be highly rated. Britain, with an army to enforce her tyranny, has declared that she has a right (not only to tax) but "to bind us in all cases whatsoever," and if being bound in that manner, is not slavery, then is there not such a thing as slavery upon earth. Even the expression is impious, for so unlimited a power can belong only to God.

Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)

Source: The American Crisis, no. 1, December 23, 1776

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on army and danger

Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

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