argument

A Quote by Margaret Hilda Thatcher on argument and politics

I always cheer up immensely if an attack is particularly wounding because I think, well, if they attack one personally, it means they have not a single political argument left.

Margaret Thatcher (1925 -)

Source: London Daily Telegraph, March 21, 1986

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Malcolm X on argument, mathematics, mistakes, reason, and thought

I'm sorry to say that the subject I most disliked was mathematics. I have thought about it. I think the reason was that mathematics leaves no room for argument. If you made a mistake, that was all there was to it.

Malcolm X (1925 - 1965)

Source: Mascot.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on argument, challenge, clarity, justice, mind, and truth

When an opinionated person starts to challenge something, his mind shuts out all that could clear up the matter. The argument irritates him, however just it might be, and it seems that he is afraid of discovering the truth.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Justice Louis Dembitz Brandeis on argument and ignorance

Behind every argument is someone's ignorance.

Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856 - 1941)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lord Hailsham on argument

The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the right.

Lord Hailsham

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lillian Whiting on argument, assumptions, education, individuality, purity, time, and water

The individual who cultivates grievances, and who is perpetually exacting explanations of his assumed wrongs, can only be ignored, and left to the education of time and of development.... One does not argue or contend with the foul miasma that settles over stagnant water; one leaves it and climbs to a higher region, where the air is pure and the sunshine fair.

Lillian Whiting

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on argument, fatherhood, laws, lawyers, talking, and speech

"In my youth," said his father, "I look to the law,
  And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw
  Has lasted the rest of my life."

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Alice's Adventures In Wonderland, Chapter 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Junius on argument, experience, life, maxims, and reason

It is a maxim received in life that, in general, we can determine more wisely for others than for ourselves. The reason of it is so dear in argument that it hardly wants the confirmation of experience.

Junius

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J.Richard Clarke on argument, failure, and success

You cannot explain failure any more than you can argue with success.

J.Richard Clarke (1927 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Josiah Quincy on ability, anecdotes, approval, argument, cities, conversation, day, determination, fame, good, journeys, justice, laws, lawyers, libraries, money, preparation, presidency, time, and work

Josiah Quincy, one-time mayor of Boston and president of Harvard University, recalled: "I will repeat an anecdote which I think Daniel Webster gave at a dinner, though, as I made no note of it, it is just possible that he told it in my presence at some later date. The conversation was running upon the importance of doing small things thoroughly and with the full measure of one's ability. This Webster illustrated by an account of some petty insurance case that was brought to him when a young lawyer in Portsmouth. Only a small amount was involved, and a twenty-dollar fee was all that was promised. "He saw that, to do his clients full justice, a journey to Boston, to consult the law library, would be desirable. He would be out of pocket by such an expedition, and for his time he would receive no adequate compensation. After a little hesitation he determined to do his very best, cost cost what it might. He accordingly went to Boston looked up the authorities, and gained the case. "Years after this, Webster, then famous, was passing through New York City. An important insurance case was to be tried the day after his arrival, and one of the counsel had been suddenly taken ill. Money was no object, and Webster was begged to name his terms and conduct the case. " 'I told them,' Mr. Webster, 'that it was preposterous to prepare a legal argument at a few hours' notice. They insisted, however, that I should look at the papers; and this after some demur, I consented to do. Well, it was my old twenty-dollar case over again, and as I never forget anything, I had all the authorities at my fingers' ends. The Court knew that I had no time to prepare, and was astonished at the range of my acquirements. So, you see, I was handsomely paid both in fame and money for that journey to Boston; and the moral is that good work is rewarded in the end, though, to be sure, one's self-approval should be enough.'"

Josiah Quincy (1744 - 1775)

Contributed by: Zaady

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