argument

A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on argument, character, decisions, and stupidity

Once the decision has been made, close your ear even to the best counter argument: sign of a strong character. Thus an occasional will to stupidity.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on argument, correction, learning, mistakes, and people

Don't argue for other people's weaknesses. Don't argue for your own. When you make a mistake, admit it, correct it, and learn from it -- immediately.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

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A Quote by Zacharia Johnson on argument, constitution, oppression, people, persecution, possessions, religion, and weapons

Zacharia Johnson argued that the new Constitution could never result in religious persecution or other oppression because: The people are not to be disarmed of their weapons. They are left in full possession of them.

Zacharia Johnson

Source: 1788, During Virginia’s ratification convention for the U.S. Constitution

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, conversation, and democracy

The best argument against democracy is a five minute conversation with the average voter.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument and difficulty

Don't argue about difficulties. The difficulties will argue for themselves.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by William Strunk, Jr. on argument and principles

In exposition and in argument, the writer must likewise never lose his hold upon the concrete; and even when he is dealing with general principles, he must furnish particular instances of their application.

William Strunk (1869 - 1946)

Source: Strunk & White in The Elements of Style, 1918, Third Revision, 1979, p. 22-23.

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on argument

He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Love’s Labour’s Lost

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A Quote by William Pitt, "the Elder Pitt on argument, freedom, necessity, and slavery

Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.

William Pitt (1708 - 1778)

Source: speech on the India Bill 18 November 1783

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A Quote by William Pitt, "the Elder Pitt on argument, freedom, necessity, slavery, and tyranny

Necessity is the excuse for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of the tyrant and the creed of the slave.

William Pitt (1708 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

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