apologies

A Quote by Mark Twain on apologies, communication, day, dedication, honesty, privilege, simplicity, and spelling

This morning arrives a letter from my ancient silver-mining comrade, Calvin H. Higbie, a man whom I have not seen nor had communication with for forty-four years. . . . [Footnote: Roughing It is dedicated to Higbie.] . . . I shall allow myself the privilege of copying his punctuation and his spelling, for to me they are a part of the man. He is as honest as the day is long. He is utterly simple-minded and straightforward, and his spelling and his punctuation are as simple and honest as he is himself. He makes no apology for them, and no apology is needed.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Additional Notes to his Autobiography, March 26, 1906

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on apologies

In her face excuse Came prologue, and apology too prompt.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ix. Line 853.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jay Leno on apologies, destruction, and god

If God doesn't destroy Hollywood Boulevard, he owes Sodom and Gomorrah an apology.

Jay Leno (1950 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Harry S. Truman on apologies and defense

Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive. And don't ever apologize for anything.

Harry Truman (1884 - 1972)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Herbert Walker Bush on america, apologies, and facts

I will never apologize for the United States of America - I don't care what the facts are. Said after 'Vincennes' shot down an Iranian Airliner.

George H.W. Bush (1924 -)

Source: Newsweek Magazine, 15 Aug 1989.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by F. Burton Howard on anger, apologies, automobiles, certainty, choice, christmas, cities, clarity, college, confusion, day, decisions, driving, family, fatherhood, good, history, home, jokes, journeys, kiss, laughter, life, losing, mountains, n

When I was in my first year of college at Logan, Utah, I bought an old car for a hundred dollars. I was eighteen and thought that I knew all about driving. It was Christmastime, and my parents were living on a ranch in Wyoming. I picked up my two grandmothers and took them to my parents' home for Christmas. We had a grand time there. When it was time to return to school, the weather had changed and the roads were treacherous. That morning as we were ready to leave, we held a family prayer in the living room. My father prayed that we would have a safe journey. After we had loaded my car with suitcases, blankets, tuna fish sandwiches, and a thermos bottle full of Postum, Dad walked out to the car and said, 'I want to talk to you.' We went over and stood by the fence. 'You have a very valuable cargo,' he said, nodding at my grandmothers. 'I want you to promise me that if the roads are bad and it's snowing when you get down to Lander, you won't go over South Pass. I want you to take the long way.' I promised him that I would. My parents kissed us good-bye, and we were on our way. We had nice weather until we got to Riverton; then it started to snow. By the time we got to Lander, it was snowing pretty hard. I remembered my promise, so when we came to the intersection where you turn to go up the mountain, I made a conscious turn to go the long way. I remember thinking then that it was going to take us five hours longer to get to Utah. I knew the road, and I was absolutely certain that I had made the right turn. As we drove along, we were joking and laughing, although the snow was getting thicker. Then I saw a sign that read, 'Historic Old South Pass City,' and I realized that I had somehow become confused in the snowstorm and had taken the wrong road! I thought, Dad will be angry with me! I don't know how this happened-it wasn't intentional. I had only two choices: I could keep on going, or I could turn around and go back. By this time, we were at the summit, so I decided that we might as well keep going and that I would apologize to Dad later. As we came down the mountain, the snow stopped and the roads were clear. We drove to Logan and then to Malad without any problems. On my way to school the next day I happened to see the front-page headline of a newspaper: WORST BLIZZARD OF THE YEAR STRANDS HUNDREDS IN CENTRAL WYOMING. I bought a paper, and it was full of stories about people who had been stranded, lost, or killed on the road that I had promised to take. I realized that the prayer our family had offered had been answered. I knew that the Lord had gotten us on the right road, and I realized how He had protected us. I was never the same after that.

F. Burton Howard (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clifford Stoll on apologies

It's easier to apologize afterwards than getting something allowed in the first place.

Clifford Stoll

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Disraeli on apologies, feeling, and truth

Never apologize for showing feeling. When you do so you apologize for truth.

Benjamin Disraeli (1804 - 1881)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Disraeli on apologies

Apologies only account for that which they do not alter.

Benjamin Disraeli (1804 - 1881)

Source: Speech, July 28, 1871.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on ability, acceptance, apologies, effort, evil, existence, facts, guilt, honesty, life, men, money, order, people, questions, success, support, value, wishes, work, and worth

I am rich and proud of every penny I own. I made my money by my own effort, in free exchange and through the voluntary consent of every man I dealt with - the voluntary consent of those who employed me when I started, the voluntary consent of those who work for me now, the voluntary consent of those who buy my product. I shall answer all the questions you are afraid to ask me openly. Do I wish to pay my workers more than their services are worth to me? I do not. Do I wish to sell my product for less than my customers are willing to pay me? I do not. Do I wish to sell it at a loss or give it away? I do not. If this is evil, do whatever you please about me, according to whatever standards you hold. These are mine. I am earning my own living, as every honest man must. I refuse to accept as guilt the fact of my own existence and the fact that I must work in order to support it. I refuse to accept as guilt the fact that I am able to do it and do it well. I refuse to accept as guilt the fact that I am able to do it better than most people - the fact that my work is of greater value than the work of my neighbours and that more men are willing to pay me. I refuse to apologize for my ability - I refuse to apologize for my success - I refuse to apologize for my money.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 446-7)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content