aphorisms

A Quote by Raphie on beats, picasso, and aphorisms

He spouted neo-post-Beat banalities like Picasso drew for kicks.

Raphie Frank

Contributed by: Raphie

A Quote by William Rounseville Alger on aphorisms, feeling, thought, and wisdom

Aphorisms are portable wisdom, the quintessential extracts of thought and feeling.

William Rounseville Alger (1822 - 1905)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stefan Kanfer on aphorisms, observation, privacy, and truth

An aphorism is a personal observation inflated into a universal truth, a private posing as a general.

Stefan Kanfer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Taylor Coleridge on aphorisms, knowledge, and men

Exclusively of the abstract sciences, the largest and worthiest portion of our knowledge consists of aphorisms, and the greatest and best of men is but an aphorism.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on aphorisms, excellence, sentimentality, truth, and words

The excellence of aphorisms consists not so much in the expression of some rare or abstruse sentiment, as in the comprehension of some useful truth in a few words.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marlene Dietrich on aphorisms

Aphorisms are thoughts one might have . . . expressed . . . by someone recognizably wiser than oneself.

Marlene Dietrich (1901 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Logan Pearsall Smith on aphorisms, clothes, intuition, and words

An aphorism is [that which] drags from obscurity a recognizable intuition by clothing it in words.

Logan Smith (1865 - 1946)

Source: adapted from Logan Pearsall Smith

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Logan Pearsall Smith on aphorisms and reason

Aphorisms are salted not sugared almonds at Reason's Feast.

Logan Smith (1865 - 1946)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Karl Kraus on aphorisms and truth

An aphorism is never exactly true; it is either a half-truth or one-and-a-half truths.

Karl Kraus (1874 - 1936)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on aphorisms, meaning, ridicule, and truth

We have oftener than once endeavoured to attach some meaning to that aphorism, vulgarly imputed to Shaftesbury, which however we can find nowhere in his works, that "ridicule is the test of truth."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Voltaire. Foreign Review, 1829.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content