anxiety

A Quote by Robert Burton on ambition, anxiety, birds, dogs, labor, and men

Like dogs in a wheel, birds in a cage, or squirrels in a chain, ambitious men still climb and climb, with great labor, and incessant anxiety,but never reach the top.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

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A Quote by Queen Victoria on anxiety and women

The Queen is most anxious to enlist everyone in checking this mad, wicked folly of ''Women's Rights.'' It is a subject which makes the Queen so furious that she cannot contain herself.

Queen Victoria

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A Quote by Plato on anxiety, caring, and questions

The partisan, when he is engaged in a dispute, cares nothing about the rights of the question, but is anxious only to convince his hearers of his own assertions.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

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A Quote by Plato on anxiety and men

Nothing in the affairs of men is worthy of great anxiety.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

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A Quote by Paul Tillich on anxiety, courage, doubt, and god

The courage to be is rooted in the God who appears when God has disappeared in the anxiety of doubt.

Paul Tillich (1886 - 1965)

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A Quote by Paul Tillich on anxiety and existence

The basic anxiety, the anxiety of a finite being about the threat of non-being, cannot be eliminated. It belongs to existence itself.

Paul Tillich (1886 - 1965)

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A Quote by Publius Ovidius Naso Ovid on anxiety, pleasure, and purity

There is no such thing as pure pleasure; some anxiety always goes with it.

Ovid (43 BC - c. 18 AD)

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A Quote by Orison Swett Marden on anxiety, god, life, and medicine

Mirth is God's medicine; everybody ought to bathe in it. Grim care, moroseness, anxiety-all the rust of life- ought to be scoured off by the oil of mirth.

Orison Swett Marden (1850 - 1924)

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A Quote by Norman Vincent Peale on anxiety, clarity, confusion, day, friendship, life, losing, power, privacy, time, world, and worry

Worry is a peculiar thing. It is like a dust storm on a hot day. You can become confused and lose your way. I was in Wichita, Kansas, some time ago, when I had to fly to Cincinnati. A friend sent me in a private plane. When we were crossing the Mississippi River, the sky grew hazy. "We can't see where we're going,"I said to the pilot. He replied,"We'll go up above the haze-level." "What's the haze-level," I asked. "Ground heat, dust, and smoke combine to form the haze-level. We'll go up another thousand feet and get above it." We did and emerged into an altogether different world, clear and beautiful. The pilot commented, "Life is something like this, isn't it? Down there they are groping in the haze. Up here, we have clarity and can see our way. Next time you find yourself bogged down in anxiety and worry, say to yourself, "I will not be disturbed by this thing. I will look at it coolly and logically. I will rise above the haze-level." You will find that your worry has lost its power.

Norman Vincent Peale (1898 - 1993)

Source: How to Handle Tough Times by Norman Vincent Peale

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Cotton on anxiety, death, life, reputation, and weapons

The two most precious things this side of the grave are our reputation and our life. But it is to be lamented that the most contemptible whisper may deprive us of the one, and the weakest weapon of the other. A wise man, therefore, will be more anxious to deserve a fair name than to possess it, and this will teach him so to live as not to be afraid to die.

Nathaniel Cotton (1705 - 1788)

Contributed by: Zaady

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