anxiety

A Quote by W. Timothy Gallwey on action, anxiety, awareness, limits, mind, potential, purity, thought, and winning

Both Arthur Ashe and Billie Jean King used these phrases ("playing out of one's mind," or "over one's head") to describe their performances while winning tghe finals at Wimbledon in 1975. . . . The player loses himself in the action, continually breaki g the false limits placed on is potential. Awareness becomes acutely heightened, while analysis, anxiety and self-conscious thought are compoletly forgotten. Enjoyment is at a peak - pure and unspoiled.

W. Timothy Gallwey (1938 -)

Source: Tim Gallwey in The Inner Game of Tennis, 1976, p. 9

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on anxiety, belief, bureaucracy, certainty, community, concern, country, creativity, desires, family, future, ideas, leisure, life, luxury, money, nature, nostalgia, past, reward, self-reliance, technology, present, and work

It's not a single idea, but many ideas and attitudes, including a reverence for nature and a preference for country life; a desire for maximum personal self-reliance and creative leisure; a concern for family nurture and community cohesion; a certain hostility toward luxury; a belief that the primary reward of work should be well-being rather than money; a certain nostalgia for the supposed simplicities of the past and an anxiety about the technological and bureaucratic complexities of the present and the future; and a taste for the plain and functional.

unknown

Source: Countryside Magazine and Small Stock Journal – Philosophy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ulysses S. Grant on anxiety and present

A man anxious to tell a dirty story asked, "Are there any ladies present?" Ulysses S. Grant spoke up and replied, "There are no ladies present, but there are gentlemen."

Ulysses S. Grant (1822 - 1885)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on anxiety, life, power, providence, remedies, and trust

Anxiety is the rust of life, destroying its brightness and weakening its power. A childlike and abiding trust in Providence is its best preventive and remedy.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Vernor Smith on anxiety, army, belief, bitterness, chance, day, death, disaster, dreams, endurance, foolishness, freedom, friendship, glory, government, heart, hope, ignorance, laughter, life, losing, patience, peace, people, pity, powe

No man made great by death offers more hope to lowly pride than does Abraham Lincoln; for while living he was himself so simple as often to be dubbed a fool. Foolish he was, they said, in losing his youthful heart to a grave and living his life on married patience; foolish in pitting his homely ignorance against Douglas, brilliant, courtly, and urbane; foolish in setting himself to do the right in a world where the day goes mostly to the strong; foolish in dreaming of freedom for a long-suffering folk whom the North is as anxious to keep out as the South was to keep down; foolish in choosing the silent Grant to lead to victory the hesitant armies of the North; foolish, finally, in presuming that government for the people must be government of the people and by the people. Foolish many said; foolish many, many believed. This Lincoln, whom so many living friends and foes alike deemed foolish, hid his bitterness in laughter; fed his sympathy on solitude; and met recurring disaster with whimsicality to muffle the murmur of a bleeding heart. Out of the tragic sense of life he pitied where others blamed; bowed his own shoulders with the woes of the weak; endured humanely his little day of chance power; and won through death what life disdains to bestow upon such simple souls - lasting peace and everlasting glory.

Thomas Vernor Smith

Source: Illinois Senate, Feb 12,’35, Lincoln's 126th birthday —Smith, Lincoln, Living Legend, pp. 3-5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on ability, acting, anxiety, character, citizenship, concern, difficulty, duty, honesty, individuality, information, interest, knowledge, men, motives, necessity, time, and understanding

Of the various executive abilities, no one excited more anxious concern than that of placing the interests of our fellow-citizens in the hands of honest men, with understanding sufficient for their stations. No duty is at the same time more difficult to fulfil. The knowledge of character possessed by a single individual is of necessity limited. To seek out the best through the whole Union, we must resort to the information which from the best of men, acting disinterestedly and with the purest motives, is sometimes incorrect.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Elias Shipman and others of New Haven, July 12, 1801.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on anxiety, cheerfulness, day, and resignation

For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing ling'ring look behind?

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 22.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on age, anxiety, thought, and time

When I turned two I was really anxious, because I'd doubled my age in a year. I thought, if this keeps up, by the time I'm six I'll be ninety.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on anxiety, bitterness, boredom, christianity, day, eternity, knowledge, learning, life, people, and teachers

To live thus - to cram today with eternity and not wait the next day - the Christian has learnt and continues to learn (for the Christian is always learning) from the Pattern. How did He manage to live without anxiety for the next day - He who from the first instant of His public life, when He stepped forward as a teacher, knew how His life would end, that the next day was His crucifixion; knew this while the people exultantly hailed Him as King (ah, bitter knowledge to have at precisely that moment!); knew, when they were crying, Hosanna!, at His entry into Jerusalem, that they would cry, "Crucify Him!", and that it was to this end that He made His entry. He who bore every day the prodigious weight of this superhuman knowledge - how did He manage to live without anxiety for the next day?

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: Christian Discourses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on anxiety and freedom

Anxiety is the dizziness of freedom.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

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