animals

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals, gold, horses, and surprises

HIPPOGRIFF, n. An animal (now extinct) which was half horse and half griffin. The griffin was a compound creature, half lion and half eagle. The hippogriff was, therefore, only one quarter eagle, which is $2.50 in gold. Zoology is full of surprises.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals and horses

GNU, n. An animal of South Africa, which in its domesticated state resembles a horse, a buffalo and a stag. In its wild condition it is something like a thunderbolt, an earthquake and a cyclone.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals, death, and purpose

FORK, n. An instrument used chiefly for the purpose of putting dead animals into the mouth.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on adversity, animals, proverbs, satisfaction, and weakness

CUNNING, n. The faculty that distinguishes a weak animal or person from a strong one. It brings its possessor much mental satisfaction and great material adversity. An Italian proverb says: "The furrier gets the skins of more foxes than asses."

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alice Hopf on animals

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If an animal's not equipped to make sounds like talking, it doesn't mean it can't think. All we have to do is to figure out how to make it convey its thoughts.

Alice Hopf (1904 - ?)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Armand Montapert on action, animals, difficulty, love, loyalty, and people

Animals are reliable, many full of love, true in their affections, predictable in their actions, grateful and loyal. Difficult standards for people to live up to.

Alfred Montapert (1906 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Alexis Henri Clérel de Tocqueville on acting, animals, community, destruction, existence, force, government, guidance, energy, men, nations, originality, people, power, rules, society, and timidity

After having thus successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp and fashioned him at will, the government then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a network of small, complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd. The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent, and guided; men are seldom forced by it to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting. Such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence: it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervates, extinguishes, and stupefies a people, till each nation is reduced to nothing better than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd.

Alexis de Tocqueville (1805 - 1859)

Source: 1831

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on animals

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Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on animals, attitude, catholicism, christianity, men, nature, and violence

Compared with that of Taoists and Far Eastern Buddhists, the Christian attitude toward Nature has been curiously insensitive and often downright domineering and violent. Taking their cue from an unfortunate remark in Genesis, Catholic moralists have regarded animals as mere things which men do right to regard for their own ends. . . .

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldo Leopold on animals, harmony, life, listening, music, plants, songs, and understanding

This song of the waters is audible to every ear, but there is other music in these hills, by no means audible to all. . . . On a still night, when the campfire is low and the Pleiades have climbed over rimrocks, sit quietly and listen . . . and think hard of everything you have seen and tried to understand. Then you may hear it - a vast pulsing harmony - its score inscribed on a thousand hills, its notes the lives and deaths of plants and animals, its rhythms spanning the seconds and the centuries.

Aldo Leopold

Contributed by: Zaady

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