animals

A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on animals and slavery

Animals, whom we have made our slaves, we do not like to consider our equal.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on animals, kindness, and mind

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher mammals in their mental faculties. . . . The difference in mind between man and the higher animals, great as it is, certainly is one of degree and not of kind.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

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A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on animals, boasts, curiosity, emotion, imitation, intuition, love, memory, reason, and senses

We have seen that the senses and intuitions, the various emotions and faculties, such as love, memory, attention and curiosity, imitation, reason, etc., of which man boasts, may be found in an incipient, or even sometimes in a well-developed condition, in the lower animals.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

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A Quote by Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr. on animals, challenge, civilization, clarity, discovery, knowledge, life, men, plants, progress, quality, and science

Is civilization progress? The challenge, I think, is clear; and, as clearly, the final answer will be given not by our amassing of knowledge, or by the discoveries of our science, or by the speed of our aircraft, but by the effect of our civilized activities as a whole have upon the quality of our planet's life-the life of plants and animals as that of men.

Charles Lindbergh (1902 - 1974)

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A Quote by Carol Williams on animals, difficulty, earth, health, life, people, thought, and work

An agricultural adage says the tiny animals that live below the surface of a healthy pasture weigh more than the cows grazing above it. In a catalogue selling composting equipment I read that two handfuls of healthy soil contain more living organisms than there are people on the earth. What these beings are and what they can be doing is difficult to even begin to comprehend, but it helps to realize that even thought they are many, they work as one.

Carol Williams

Source: Bringing a Garden to Life, 1998

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A Quote by Carl Sandburg on animals, life, and poetry

Poetry is the journal of the sea animal living on land, wanting to fly in the air. Poetry is a search for syllables to shoot at the barriers of the unknown and the unknowable. Poetry is a phantom script telling how rainbows are made and why they go away.

Carl Sandburg (1878 - 1967)

Source: Poetry Considered

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A Quote by Brigid Brophy on animals, oppression, and slavery

To us it seems incredible that the Greek philosophers should have scanned so deeply into right and wrong and yet never noticed the immorality of slavery. Perhaps 3000 years from now it will seem equally incredible that we not notice the immorality of our own oppression of animals.

Brigid Brophy (1929 -)

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A Quote by Brigid Brophy on animals, belief, fulfillment, judgment, justice, life, pain, and worth

I don't myself believe that, even when we fulfill our minimum obligations not to cause pain, we have the right to kill animals. I know I would not have the right to kill you, however painlessly, just because I liked your flavour, and I am not in a position to judge that your life is worth more to you than the animal's to it.

Brigid Brophy (1929 -)

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A Quote by Brendan Behan on animals, food, kindness, laws, men, men and women, respect, society, value, and women

I value kindness to humans first of all, and kindness to animals. I don't respect the law; I have total irreverence for anything connected with society except that which makes the roads safer, the beer stronger, the food cheaper, and old men and women warmer in the winter, and happier in the summer.

Brendan Behan (1923 - 1964)

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A Quote by Blaise Pascal on adultery, animals, desires, destruction, earth, emptiness, god, good, happiness, lies, losing, nature, plants, reason, survival, present, vices, and war

What does this desire and this inability of ours proclaim to us but that there was once in man a genuine happiness, of which nothing now survives but the mark and the empty outline; and this he vainly tries to fill from everything that lies around him, seeking from things that are not there the help that he does not get from those that are present? Yet they are quite incapable of filling the gap, because this infinite gulf can only be filled by an infinite and immutable object - that is, God, Himself. He alone is man's veritable good, and since man has deserted Him it is a strange thing that there is nothing in nature that has not been capable of taking His place for man: stars, sky, earth, elements, plants, cabbages, leeks, animals, insects, calves, serpents, fever, plague, war, famine, vices, adultery, incest. And since he has lost the true good, everything can equally appear to him as such - even his own destruction, though that is so contrary at once to God, to reason, and to nature.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

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