angels

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, anger, authority, brevity, and heaven

Man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, As make the angels weep.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MEASURE FOR MEASURE, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, bankers, gold, harmony, heaven, immortality, music, soul, and stillness

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica: look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold; There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins. Such harmony is in immortal souls; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, animals, beauty, god, nobility, reason, women, work, and world

What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me: no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, spoken by Hamlet, Act II, scene ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, good, heart, nobility, and rest

Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night sweet prince, And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 5, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on angels and purity

When one that holds communion with the skies Has fill'd his urn where these pure waters rise, And once more mingles with us meaner things, 'T is e'en as if an angel shook his wings.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Charity. Line 435.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on angels, birth, earth, joy, and love

The Angel that presided o'er my birth Said 'Little creature, form'd of joy and mirth, Go, love without the help of anything on earth.'

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: Gnomic Verses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on angels, jokes, and lies

I asked a thief to steal me a peach: He turned up his eyes. I asked a lithe lady to lie her down: Holy and meek, she cries. As soon as I went An angel came. He winked at the thief And smiled at the dame- And without one word spoke Had a peach from the tree, And 'twixt earnest and joke Enjoyed the lady.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: Poems from Blake’s Notebook, I Asked a Thief

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Map or Mapes on angels, death, god, mercy, and wine

I intend to die in a tavern; let the wine be placed near my dying mouth, so that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, "God be merciful to this drinker!"

Walter Map (c.1140 - c.1209)

Source: De nugis curialium (Courtiers’ triflings), 1182-1192

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Viktor E. Frankl on angels, glory, life, losing, time, understanding, and words

For the first time in my life, I was able to understand the words, "The angels are lost in perpetual contemplation of an infinite glory."

Viktor Frankl (1905 - 1997)

Source: Dr. Victor E. Frankl in Man’s Search for Meaning, Simon and Schuster, NY, 1963.

Contributed by: Zaady

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