america

A Quote by Thomas Clayton Wolfe on america, birth, chance, opportunity, promises, vision, and work

To every man his chance - to every man, regardless of his birth, his shining, golden opportunity - to every man the right to live, to work, to be himself, and to become whatever thing his manhood and his vision can combine to make him - this, seeker, is the promise of America.

Thomas Clayton Wolfe (1900 - 1938)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Alva Edison on america, bravery, business, courage, faith, fatherhood, and prosperity

Be courageous. I have seen many depressions in business. Always America has emerged from these stronger and more prosperous. Be brave as your fathers before you. Have faith! Go forward!

Thomas Edison (1847 - 1931)

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A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, exercise, force, police, and power

In the Western Hemisphere the adherence of the United States to the Monroe Doctrine may force the United States, however reluctantly, in flagrant cases of such wrong doing or impotence, to the exercise of an international police power.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: AnnuaI Message to Congress: Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, December 6, 1904

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A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

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A Quote by Terence Kealey on america, computers, country, decisions, economics, electricity, future, generations, government, growth, losing, money, myth, power, projects, research, science, service, success, war, wealth, and world

There is a central myth about British science and economic growth, and it goes like this: science breeds wealth, Britain is in economic decline, therefore Britain has not done enough science. Actually, it is easy to show that a key cause of Britain's economic decline has been that the government has funded too much science. . . . Post-war British science policy illustrates the folly of wasting money on research. The government decided, as it surveyed the ruins of war-torn Europe in 1945, that the future lay in computers, nuclear power and jet aircraft, so successive administrations poured money into these projects-to vast technical success. The world's first commercial mainframe computer was British, sold by Ferrranti in 1951; the world's first commercial jet aircraft was British, the Comet, in service in 1952; the first nuclear power station was British, Calder Hall, commissioned in 1956; and the world's first and only supersonic commercial jet aircraft was Anglo-French, Concorde, in service in 1976. Yet these technical advances crippled us economically, because they were so uncommercial. The nuclear generation of electricity, for example, had lost 2.1 billion pounds by 1975 (2.1 billion pounds was a lot then); Concord had lost us, alone, 2.3 billion pounds by 1976; the Comet crashed and America now dominates computers. Had these vast sums of money not been wasted on research, we would now be a significantly richer country.

Terence Kealey

Source: Terence Kealey Wasting Billions, the Scientific Way, The Sunday Times, Oct. 13, 1996.

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A Quote by Ted Turner on america, people, and world

The United States has got some of the dumbest people in the world. I want you to know that we know that.

Ted Turner (1938 -)

Source: addressing international journalists, 1996.

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A Quote by Steven Wright on america

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I have a map of the United States . . . actual size. It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile" I spent last summer folding it.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

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A Quote by Stephen Vincent Benét on america and losing

When Daniel Boone goes by at night The phantom deer arise And all lost, wild America Is burning in their eyes.

Stephen Benet (1898 - 1943)

Source: Daniel Boone, 1942

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A Quote by Spiro Theodore Agnew on america and sharing

In the United States today, we have more than our share of nattering nabobs of negativism.

Spiro Agnew (1918 - 1996)

Source: 1970, San Diego

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A Quote by Shana Alexander on america, constitution, custom, jobs, luck, presidency, rules, wives, and women

Roughly speaking, the President of the United States knows what his job is. Constitution and custom spell it out, for him as well as for us. His wife has no such luck. The First Lady has no rules; rather each new woman must make her own.

Shana Alexander (1925 -)

Source: The Feminine Eye, 1966

Contributed by: Zaady

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