ambition

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on ambition, difficulty, fortune, greatness, heart, and losing

To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty;to keep heart when all have lost it; to go through intrigue spotless;to forego even ambition when the end is gained - who can say this is not greatness?

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition and life

Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up Thine own life's means!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 2, scene 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on age, aim, ambition, angels, corruption, country, enemies, envy, fear, god, heaven, honesty, hope, integrity, justice, love, peace, silence, truth, and zeal

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition: By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then, The image of his Maker, hope to win by it? Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr! Serve the king; And,-prithee, lead me in: There take an inventory of all I have, To the last penny; 'tis the king's: my robe, And my integrity to heaven, is all I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell! Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VIII, Cardinal Wolsey in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition

Choked with ambition of the meaner sort.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI, Part I, Act II

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, art, fear, illness, kindness, nature, and play

. . . yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great; Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win:

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, dreams, god, good, mind, thinking, and world

HAMLET Denmark's a prison. ROSENCRANTZ Then is the world one. HAMLET A goodly one; in which there are many confines, wards and dungeons, Denmark being one o' the worst. ROSENCRANTZ We think not so, my lord. HAMLET Why, then, 'tis none to you; for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so: to me it is a prison. ROSENCRANTZ Why then, your ambition makes it one; 'tis too narrow for your mind. HAMLET O God, I could be bounded in a nut shell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams. GUILDENSTERN Which dreams indeed are ambition, for the very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 2, scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition and proof

'Tis a common proof, That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber-upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Caesar, Act 2 scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, evil, faith, faults, friendship, good, honor, justice, life, love, men, nobility, and praise

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Cæsar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Cæsar. The noble Brutus Hath told Cæsar was ambitious; If it were so, it was a grievous fault; And grievously hath Cæsar answer'd it. . . . . For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men. . . . . He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. . . . . When that the poor have cried, Cæsar hath wept; Ambition should be made of sterner stuff . . . . You all did love him once, not without cause.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on ambition, fortune, men, and power

The tallest trees are most in the power of the winds, and ambitious men of the blasts of fortune.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content