agriculture

A Quote by John Locke on agriculture, army, dignity, fashion, idleness, men, profit, sports, thought, and understanding

The great men among the ancients understood very well how to reconcile manual labour with affairs of state, and thought it no lessening to their dignity to make the one the recreation to the other. That indeed which seems most generally to have employed and diverted their spare hours, was agriculture. Gideon among the Jews was taken from threshing, as well as Cincinnatus amongst the Romans from the plough, to command the armies of their countries . . . and, as I remember, Cyrus thought gardening so little beneath the dignity and grandeur of a throne, that he showed Xenophon a large field of fruit trees all of his own planting . . . Delving, planting, inoculating, or any the like profitable employments would be no less a diversion than any of the idle sports in fashion, if men could be brought to delight in them.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Two Treatises of Government, 1698

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on agriculture, architecture, children, history, liberty, mathematics, music, order, painting, philosophy, poetry, politics, sons, study, and war

I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Abigail Adams, May 12, 1780.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on agriculture, architecture, art, children, duty, government, history, liberty, mathematics, negotiation, order, painting, philosophy, poetry, politics, science, sons, study, war, and wives

The Science of Government it is my duty to study, more than all other Sciences: the Art of Legislation and Administration and Negotiation, ought to take place, indeed to exclude in a manner all other Arts.-I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study Mathematics and Philosophy. My sons ought to study Mathematics and Philosophy, Geography, natural History, Naval Architecture, navigation, Commerce and Agriculture, in order to give their Children a right to study Painting, Poetry, Musick, Architecture, Statuary, Tapestry and Porcelaine. This letter has not been dated precisely, but appears to have been written after Adams's letter to his wife on May 12, and before one written to her on May 15.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: letter to Abigail Adams, after May 12, 1780.—Adams Family Correspondence, ed. L. H. Butterfield, vol. 3, p. 342 (1973).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edwin T. Morris on agriculture, civilization, contempt, country, divinity, feeling, life, nobility, simplicity, and traditions

In Europe, the word peasant was a term of contempt used by the nobility, but the Chinese scholars used to fancy themselves rustics. Agriculture was viewed as a noble occupation; buying and selling, by contrast were considered nonproductive. One of the founders of the Chinese civilization was said to have been the venerable She Nung, the "Divine Farmer." A scholar often affected to be nothing more than an "old farmer" or a "simple fisherman" and referred to his elegant villa as "my thatched hut." This Rosseau-like feeling for the country life is an important undercurrent in the scholarly tradition.

Edwin T. Morris

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Earl O. Shreve on agriculture, boldness, discovery, effort, future, government, labor, lies, miracles, optimism, progress, promises, science, technology, war, welfare, and world

Despite world unrest, the frontiers of the future lie invitingly before us. They stretch to fabulous horizons of scientific and technological discovery-all holding promise of contribution to the national welfare. But these frontiers of tomorrow call for bold enterprise-for optimism, for the united effort of industry, labor, agriculture and government. In the mounting miracles of science, in the rapid advances of technology, lie the foundations for almost countless new industries and for far swifter social progress. This promise of progress is daily taking more definite shape and clearer form, as it shakes free of the post-war mists.

Earl O. Shreve

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Heiser on agriculture, animals, argument, certainty, change, discipline, existence, food, leisure, life, plants, seasons, and time

Agriculture probably required a far greater discipline than did any form of food collecting. Seeds had to be planted at certain seasons, some protection had to be given to the growing plants and animals, harvests had to be reaped, stored and divided. Thus, we might argue that it was neither leisure time nor a sedentary existence but the more rigorous demands associated with an agricultural way of life that led to great cultural changes.

Charles Heiser

Source: Seed to Civilization

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by C. H. Wendel on agriculture and machines

No other farm machine of this century has had such a profound effect on American agriculture as the farm tractor.

C. H. Wendel

Source: Encyclopedia of American Farm Tractors, 1979

Contributed by: Zaady

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