agreement

A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on agreement, college, grace, heart, love, needs, physics, soul, and theory

Everybody can be great. Because anybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You don't have to know about Plato and Aristotle . . . (or) Einstein's Theory of Relativity. . . (or) the Second Theory of Thermodynamics in physics to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on absence, action, agreement, belief, citizenship, direction, freedom, goals, justice, life, order, peace, seasons, and time

I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in the stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Councilor or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: "I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action"; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for someone else's freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a "more convenient season."

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Source: "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in Why We Can't Wait, 1963.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marshall McLuhan on agreement

I don't necessarily agree with everything I say.

Marshall McLuhan (1911 - 1980)

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A Quote by Maria Callas on agreement, failure, heart, music, and senses

When music fails to agree to the ear, to soothe the ear and the heart and the senses, then it had missed the point.

Maria Callas (1923 -)

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A Quote by Malcolm S. Forbes on agreement, art, birds, conversation, death, and good

One often reads about the art of conversation-how it's dying or what's needed to make it flourish, or how rare good ones are. But wouldn't you agree that the infinitely more valuable rara avis [rare bird] is a good listener.

Malcolm Forbes (1919 - 1990)

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A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on agreement, people, pleasure, and quality

There are many people who are so inclined to say "no" that the "no" always precedes whatever we say to them. This negative quality makes them so disagreeable that, even if they do what we want them to or agree with what we say, they always lose the pleasure that they might have received had they not started off so badly.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on agreement, men, and thinking

If two men agree on everything, you can be sure one of them is doing the thinking.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lillian Hellman on agreement, injustice, and people

Since when do we have to agree with people to defend them from injustice?

Lillian Hellman (1905 - 1984)

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A Quote by Lewis Thomas on agreement, failure, fashion, and sports

I do not agree with this century's fashion of running down the human species as a failed try, a doomed sport. At our worst, we may be going through the early stages of adolescence, and everyone remembers what that is like.

Lewis Thomas (1913 - 1993)

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A Quote by Lesslie Newbigin on acquaintance, agreement, christ, christianity, church, cities, civilization, community, control, culture, earth, family, force, god, home, individuality, jesus, jobs, loneliness, machines, men, nations, nature, neighbors, p

Western European civilization has witnessed a sort of atomizing process, in which the individual is more and more set free from his natural setting in family and neighborhood, and becomes a sort of replaceable unit in the social machine. His nearest neighbors may not even know his name. He is free to move from place to place, from job to job, from acquaintance to acquaintance, and - if he has attained a high degree of emancipation - from wife to wife. He is in every context a more and more anonymous and replaceable part, the perfect incarnation of the rationalist conception of man. Wherever western civilization has spread in the past one hundred years, it has carried this atomizing process with it. Its characteristic product in Calcutta, Shanghai, or Johannesburg, is the modern city into which myriads of human beings, loosened from their old ties in village or tribe or caste, like grains of sand fretted by water from an ancient block of sandstone, are ceaselessly churned around in the whirlpool of the city - anonymous, identical, replaceable units. In such a situation, it is natural that men should long for some sort of real community, for men cannot be human without it. It is especially natural that Christians should reach out after that part of Christian doctrine which speaks of the true, God-given community, the Church of Jesus Christ. We have witnessed the appalling results of trying to go back to some sort of primitive collectivity based on the total control of the individual, down t o the depths of his spirit, by an all-powerful group. Yet we know that we cannot condemn this solution to the problem of man's loneliness if we have no other to offer. It is natural that men should ask with a greater eagerness than ever before, such questions as these: "Is there in truth a family of God on earth to which I can belong, a place where all men can be truly at home? If so, where is it to be found, what are its marks, and how is it related to, and distinguished from, the known communities of family, nation, and culture? What are its boundaries, its structure, its terms of membership? And how comes it that those who claim to be the spokesmen of that one holy fellowship are themselves at war with one another as to the fundamentals of its nature, and unable to agree to live together in unity and concord?" The breakdown of Christendom has forced such questions as these to the front. I think that there is no more urgent theological task than to try to give them plain and credible answers.

Lesslie Newbigin

Source: The Household of God

Contributed by: Zaady

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