affliction

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on affliction, bitterness, soul, and world

AFFLICTION, n. An acclimatizing process preparing the soul for another and bitter world.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on absence, affliction, friendship, and men

Let me tell you I am better acquainted with you for a long absence, as men are with themselves for a long affliction: absence does but hold off a friend, to make one see him the truer.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aeschylus on advice, affliction, and prosperity

It is easy when we are in prosperity to give advice to the afflicted.

Aeschylus (525 - 456 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on adversity, affliction, good, men, philosophy, poets, pride, prosperity, and words

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence, to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: 'And this, too, shall pass away.' How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! - how consoling in the depth of affliction! Many versions of this story exist. Another one is: "The Sultan asked for a Signet motto, that should hold good for Adversity or Prosperity. Solomon gave him, 'This also shall pass away.'" - Edward Fitzgerald, Polonius: A Collection of Wise Saws and Modern Instances, item 112, p. 80 (1901). The words In neez bogzarad, which can be translated, "This also shall pass," appear in the Diven of the twelfth century Persian poet and philosopher, Sana'I of Ghaznl, ed. Mazahir Musaffa, p. 92 (1957).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 30, 1859.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on affliction, certainty, desires, direction, evil, faith, fear, generosity, god, grace, hell, hope, order, paradise, people, prophets, purity, sacred, sharing, sufi, virtue, work, and world

. . . Whoever adores Allah through the fears of the fires of hell or in order to gain Paradise, whoever invokes Him in order that his share in the goods of the world be enlarged, or so that people should turn their faces toward him in order that he be glorified, or to avoid the evil which an oppressor afflicts upon him; or further, if he has heard a hadith* of the Prophet according to which he who accomplishes a certain pious work, or recites a certain invocation, will receive from God some recompense - whoever does this, his adoration is tainted, and it will not be acceptable to God except by virtue of His grace and of His generosity. . . . God said, "Whoever hopes to encounter his Lord, let him do pious works and, in the adoration of his Lord, not associate any being with Him." (Koran 18:110) The things which I have mentioned are the "beings" which are associated with God. Now, God is, of all those that are associated in adoration, the One who absolutely transcends all association. That is why He prescribed to all His servants that they adore Him with a perfectly pure faith which implies the desire for no other recompense than His face. . . . *hadith: A saying of the Prophet transmitted outside the Qur'an through a chain of known intermediaries. There are two kinds of hadith: hadith qudsi (sacred sentence), a direct revelation, in which God speaks in the first person by the mouth of the Prophet, and hadith nabawi (prophetic sentence), an indirect revelation in which the Prophet speaks as himself. (Introduction to Sufism, p. 117)

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 4, pp. 37-38

Contributed by: Zaady

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