affection

A Quote by George Eliot on affection, children, justice, sacrifice, and suffering

Our virtues are dearer to us the more we have had to suffer for them. It is the same with our children. All profound affection entertains a sacrifice. Our thoughts are often worse than we are, just as they are often better.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gene Hill on affection, dogs, honesty, love, meaning, and understanding

Nobody can fully understand the meaning of love unless he's owned a dog. He can show you more honest affection with a flick of his tail than a man can gather through a lifetime of handshakes.

Gene Hill

Source: Tears and Laughter

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Morgan "E. M." Forster on affection, friendship, and novelty

The final test for a novel will be our affection for it, as it is the test of our friends, and of anything else which we cannot define.

E.M. Forster (1879 - 1970)

Source: Aspects of the Novel, "Introductory," 1927.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on affection and names

My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech, Conciliation w America, 22 Mar. 1775

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A Quote by Christian Nestell Bovée on affection, kiss, and passion

It is the passion that is in a kiss that gives to it its sweetness; it is the affection in a kiss that sanctifies it.

Christian Bovee (1820 - 1904)

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A Quote by Charles Horton Cooley on affection, age, children, evil, home, impulses, morality, nature, power, sharing, simplicity, success, tact, understanding, usefulness, and world

Simplicity is a pleasant thing in children, or at any age, but it is not necessarily admirable, nor is affectation altogether a thing of evil. To be normal, to be at home in the world, with a prospect of power, usefulness, or success, the person must have that imaginative insight into other minds that underlies tact and savoir-faire, morality and beneficence. This insight involves sophistication, some understanding and sharing of the clandestine impulses of human nature. A simplicity that is merely the lack of this insight indicates a sort of defect.

Charles Horton Cooley (1864 - 1929)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Gates Dawes on affection and simplicity

How majestic is naturalness. I have never met a man whom I really considered a great man who was not always natural and simple. Affectation is inevitably the mark of one not sure of himself.

Charles Gates Dawes

Source: A Journal of the Great War

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on affection

With affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Martin Chuzzelwit,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on action, affection, complaints, defense, desires, expectation, facts, hatred, hope, indifference, insanity, justice, love, reason, struggle, suspicion, thought, understanding, wealth, wishes, and words

What did they seek from him? What were they after? He had never asked anything of them; it was they who wished to hold him, they who pressed a claim on him - and they seemed to have the form of affection, but it was a form which he found harder to endure than any sort of hatred. He despised causeless affection, just as he despised unearned wealth. They professed to love him for some unknown reason and they ignored all the things for which he could wish to be loved. He wondered what response they could hope to obtain from him in such manner - if his response was what they wanted. And it was, he thought; else why those constant complaints, those unceasing accusations about his indifference? Why that chronic air of suspicion, as if they were waiting to be hurt? He had never had a desire to hurt them, but he had always felt their defensive, reproachful expectation; they seemed wounded by anything he said, it was not a matter of his words or actions, it was almost . . . almost as if they were wounded by the mere fact of his being. Don't start imagining the insane - he told himself severely, struggling to face the riddle with the strictest of his ruthless sense of justice. He could not condemn them without understanding; and he could not understand.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 42-3)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on affection and people

Most people would rather give than get affection.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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