adoption

A Quote by Anthony (Tony) Robbins on achievement, action, adoption, goals, learning, rules, and success

The most important thing you can do to achieve your goals is to make sure that as soon as you set them, you immediately begin to create momentum. The most important rules that I ever adopted to help me in achieving my goals were those I learned from a very successful man who taught me to first write down the goal, and then to never leave the site of setting a goal without firs taking some form of positive action toward its attainment.

Tony Robbins (1960 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Tyler Page on adoption, america, belief, constitution, country, democracy, duty, enemies, equality, fortune, freedom, government, humanity, justice, laws, life, love, nations, people, principles, respect, sacrifice, and support

The American's Creed adopted by the House of Representatives, April 3, 1918 I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic, a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect Union one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom; equality, justice and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend if against all enemies.

William Tyler Page (1868 - 1942)

Source: The American's Creed was a result of a nationwide contest for writing a National Creed

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, ideas, men, satisfaction, and thought

Some men never seem to grow old. Always active in thought, always ready to adopt new ideas, they are never chargeable with foggyism. Satisfied, yet ever dissatisfied, settled, yet ever unsettled, they always enjoy the best of what is, are the first to find the best of what will be.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, friendship, and soul

The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: HAMLET, Act 1, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, blessings, borrowing, character, day, entertainment, familiarity, farewells, friendship, generosity, habits, judgment, memory, seasons, soul, thought, and vulgarity

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar; The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in, Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry, This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell; my blessing season this in thee!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library), Pages: Act I Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on adoption, chance, community, genius, individuality, justice, life, men, mystery, nations, people, purity, surprises, time, and work

Sporadic great men come everywhere. But for a community to get vibrating through and through with intensely active life, many geniuses coming together and in rapid succession are required. This is why great epochs are so rare, - why the sudden bloom of a Greece, an early Rome, a Renaissance, is such a mystery. Blow must follow blow so fast that no cooling can occur in the intervals. Then the mass of the nation glows incandescent, and may continue to glow by pure inertia long after the originators of its internal movement have passed away. We often hear surprise expressed that in these high tides of human affairs not only the people should be filled with stronger life, but that individual geniuses should seem so exceptionally abundant. This mystery is just about as deep as the time-honored conundrum as to why great rivers flow by great towns. It is true that great public fermentations awaken and adopt many geniuses who in more torpid times would have had no chance to work. But over and above this there must be an exceptional concourse of genius about a time, to make the fermentation begin at all. The unlikeliness of the concourse is far greater than the unlikeliness of any particular genius; hence the rarity of these periods and the exceptional aspect which they always wear.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Admiral William D. Leahy on adoption, atoms, certainty, children, conventionality, darkness, defeat, enemies, ethics, fashion, feeling, future, peace, possessions, possibility, potential, practicality, presidency, sentimentality, success, time

Those who dismiss "revisionist" qualms about the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as indulgences in peace-time sentimentality must count President Truman's own Chief of Staff among the bleeding hearts: "It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender because of the effective sea blockade and the successful bombing with conventional weapons. . . . The lethal possibilities of atomic warfare in the future are frightening. My own feeling was that in being the first to use it, we had adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages. I was not taught to make war in that fashion , and wars cannot be won by destroying women and children. We were the first to have this weapon in our possession, and the first to use it. There is a practical certainty that potential enemies will have it in the future and that atomic bombs will some time be used against us."

William D. Leahy

Source: I Was There, 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on adoption, evolution, and theory

My theory of evolution is that Darwin was adopted.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Solomon Short on adoption, cats, and people

Cats don't adopt people. They adopt refrigerators.

Solomon Short

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Raymond Holliwell on adoption, attitude, correction, experience, and good

Each experience through which we pass operates ultimately for our good. This is a correct attitude to adopt and we must be able to see it in that light.

Raymond Holliwell

Contributed by: Zaady

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