action

A Quote by Aristotle on action, bravery, and justice

We become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

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A Quote by Aristotle on action, performance, and virtue

Virtue is more clearly shown in the performance of fine actions than in the non-performance of base ones.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

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A Quote by Aristotle on action, anger, chance, habits, and nature

Every action must be due to one or other of seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reasoning, anger, or appetite.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

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A Quote by Aristotle on action, emotion, fear, imitation, pity, seriousness, and tragedy

A tragedy is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself . . . with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

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A Quote by Archibald MacLeish on action, democracy, gold, and nations

Democracy is never a thing done. Democracy is always something that a nation must be doing. What is necessary now is one thing and one thing only . . . that democracy become again democracy in action, not democracy accomplished and piled up in goods and gold.

Archibald MacLeish (1892 - 1982)

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A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on action, comedy, literature, love, play, pleasure, and writing

I am writing a play which I probably will not finish until the end of November. I am writing it with considerable pleasure, though I sin frightfully against the conventions of the stage. It is a comedy with three female parts, six male, four acts, a landscape (view of the lake), lots of talk on literature, little action and tons of love.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

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A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on action, dogs, god, gold, nature, needs, psychology, reading, spirituality, and water

I think descriptions of nature should be very short and always be à propos. Commonplaces like "The setting sun, sinking into the waves of the darkening sea, cast its purple gold rays, etc," "Swallows, flitting over the surface of the water, twittered gaily" - eliminate such commonplaces. You have to choose small details in describing nature, grouping them in such a way that if you close your eyes after reading it you can picture the whole thing. For example, you'll get a picture of a moonlit night if you write that on the dam of the mill a piece of broken bottle flashed like a bright star and the black shadow of a dog or a wolf rolled by like a ball, etc. . . . In the realm of psychology you also need details. God preserve you from commonplaces. Best of all, shun all descriptions of the characters' spiritual state. You must try to have that state emerge clearly from their actions. Don't try for too many characters. The center of gravity should reside in two: he and she.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: To AP Chekhov, May 10, 1886

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A Quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupery on faith, steps, action, and salvation

What saves a man is to take a step. Then another step. It is always the same step, but you have to take it.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900 - 1944)

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A Quote by Anne Morrow Lindbergh on action, heart, life, and people

My life cannot implement in action the demands of all the people to whom my heart responds.

Anne Lindbergh (1906 -)

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A Quote by Andrew Jackson on action, thinking, and time

Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.

Andrew Jackson (1767 - 1845)

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