accidents

A Quote by unknown on accidents, concern, god, laws, life, mankind, obedience, principles, suffering, welfare, and wisdom

The three primary principles of wisdom: obedience to the laws of God, concern for the welfare of mankind, and suffering with fortitude all the accidents of life.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on accidents, history, and wonder

After you've heard two eyewitness accounts of an auto accident it makes you wonder about history. How do we know, for sure, what ever happened anywhere?

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on accidents, design, madness, and possessions

The mere possession of a gun is, in itself, an urge to kill, not only by design, but by accident, by madness, by fright, by bravado.

unknown

Source: a Chicago newspaper, 1967

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on accidents, achievement, bureaucracy, capitalism, death, knowledge, and progress

It's no accident that capitalism has brought with it progress, not merely in production but also in knowledge. Bureaucracy is the death of any achievement.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Truman Madsen on accidents, day, errors, forgiveness, husbands, jesus, mistakes, and wives

A man and his wife, each in a different small plane, were out enjoying a flight, when the husband committed a flight error. He was able to recover, but his wife who was following him, crashed and was killed. The husband was distraught, blaming himself for the accident. One day when pleading with the Lord for forgiveness, he heard a voice saying "Jesus died, even for dumb mistakes."

Truman Madsen

Source: Related by Truman Madsen, BYU Women’s Conference, April 2000

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Alva Edison on accidents, inventions, and work

None of my inventions came by accident-they came by work.

Thomas Edison (1847 - 1931)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on accidents, garden, happiness, and plants

Perfect moments come in every garden, though more frequently in some than others. To the very active gardener they may not be of great importance and usually they will be happy accidents, lucky moments when, chancing to glance up, the gardener will see that this or that grouping of plants at the height of their flowering looks exactly right, because of the way the light falls on them.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on accidents, achievement, awareness, design, garden, hope, nature, perfection, and planning

The more contemplative gardener, seeing the garden as a whole, the design of it, and its nature as a still place of delight and refreshment, will wait and hope for the moment when it seems to achieve perfection. Awareness of when such moments are most likely helps to make them happen; they will not be entirely accidental but anticipated; everything will be planned to encourage them.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on accidents, argument, effort, facts, fame, growth, history, justice, needs, order, plants, reflection, and understanding

Pick up a pinecone and count the spiral rows of scales. You may find eight spirals winding up to the left and 13 spirals winding up to the right, or 13 left and 21 right spirals, or other pairs of numbers. The striking fact is that these pairs of numbers are adjacent numbers in the famous Fibonacci series: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21. . . . Here, each term is the sum of the previous two terms. The phenomenon is well known and called phyllotaxis. Many are the efforts of biologists to understand why pinecones, sunflowers, and many other plants exhibit this remarkable pattern. Organisms do the strangest things, but all these odd things need not reflect selection or historical accident. Some of the best efforts to understand phyllotaxis appeal to a form of self-organization. Paul Green, at Stanford, has argued persuasively that the Fibonacci series is just what one would expect as the simplest self-repeating pattern that can be generated by the particular growth processes in the growing tips of the tissues that form sunflowers, pinecones, and so forth. Like a snowflake and its sixfold symmetry, the pinecone and its phyllotaxis may be part of order for free . . .

Stuart Kauffman

Source: Stuart Kauffman in At Home in the Universe, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 151.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steve Komac on accidents, courage, people, and students

Tony is one of the most courageous people I've ever met. Describing his student, Tony Brown, wrestling competitively at 105 lbs, a year after having both legs amputated following an accident.

Steve Komac

Source: 1996

Contributed by: Zaady

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