accidents

A Quote by Steven Weinberg on accidents, universe, and life

It is almost irrestible for humans to believe that we have some special relation to the universe, that human life is not just a more-or-less farcical outcome  of a chain of accidents reaching back to the first three minutes, but that we were somehow built in from the beginning.

Steven Weinberg

Source: cited by Michio Kaku in Parallel Worlds (2004)

Contributed by: rudyan

A Quote by Paulo Coelho on life, purpose, accidents, and meaning

And with the passing years, what had once seemed like a miracle or the luckiest of chances and which he had always promised himself he would never become enslaved by, has gradually become his sole reason to go on living.

Paulo Coelho

Source: The Winner Stands Alone: A Novel, Pages: 127

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Jeremy Clarkson on public, belief, life, death, smoke, accidents, risk, people, avoid, and security

The "public" seems to have bought into this belief that life can, and should, be run without risk, that all accidents are avoidable, and that death is something that only happens to people who eat meat and smoke.

Jeremy Clarkson

Contributed by: capreycorn

A Quote by Marcia Conner on luck, serendipity, and accidents

Instead of being more organized or controlling in your approach, allow for serendipity. Happy accidents happen when you look side to side or up, not always forward. Don't stop planning. Rather step out of the tunnel. Put yourself in situations that allow for the unexpected. Life is situationally driven. Learning happens in context. Be ready when opportunities arise. The more space you've cleared in your life for something new, the more right things will happen. More or less.

Marcia Conner

Source: Fast Company Experts Blog: More or Less: http://blog.fastcompany.com/experts/mconner/2007/12/more_or_less.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Robert I. Sutton on viagra, minoxidil, rogaine, drugs, accidents, serendipity, pfizer, upjohn, failure, success, and ideas

The process of finding new uses for old things is not always intentional. Accidental discoveries sometimes enable firms to serve unexpected customers. Viagra and Minoxidil are examples of such happy accidents. The discovery that Viaga usage was associated with penile erections in some men was initially given little attention by researchers from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals when this "side effect" was first noted in clinical trails. The drug was originally developed to be a treatment for hypertension, and after that failed, it was tested as a treatment for angina. Once again the drug failed. But this time Pfizer researchers followed up on the side effect from their earlier study. They ran clinical trials of Viagra as a treatment for erectile dysfunction, which led them to discover a new application for this existing drug. Similarly, Minoxidil was originally sold in tablet form as a treatment for high blood pressure. A side effect of this medicine was unwanted hair growth. So researchers from Upjohn started examining if it could be applied to the scalp to increase hair growth in balding men. Significant growth was observed in more than half the subjects who used it, and Minoxidil is now marketed in the United States by Upjohn as Rogaine. Researchers at both Pfizer and Upjohn didn't anticipate these side effects, but both groups were creative because they were observant and persistent enough to find new use for an existing medication. In the right hands, nothing succeeds like failure.

Robert Sutton

Source: Weird Ideas That Work: 11 1/2 Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation, Pages: 28

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by William Whewell on accidents and force

And so no force, however great, Can stretch a cord, however fine, Into a horizontal line That shall be absolutely straight. Quoted as an example of accidental metre and rhyme.

William Whewell (1794 - 1866)

Source: Whewell’s Elementary Treatise on Mechanics

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on accidents, beauty, charm, faith, farewells, heroism, negotiation, proof, and trust

Let every eye negotiate for itself And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood. This is an accident of hourly proof, Which I mistrusted not. Farewell, therefore, Hero!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William A. Niskanen on accidents, church, control, dependence, expectation, good, government, jobs, liberty, life, losing, nations, people, risk, security, television, and tragedy

Our government has become too responsive to trivial or ephemeral concerns, often at the expense of more important concerns or an erosion of our liberty, and it has made policy priorities more dependent on where TV journalists happen to point their cameras. . . . As a nation we have lost our sense of tragedy, a recognition that bad things happen to good people. A nation that expects the government to prevent churches from burning, to control the price of bread or gasoline, to secure every job, and to find some villain for every dramatic accident, risks an even larger loss of life and liberty.

William A. Niskanen

Source: “For a Less Responsive Government,” Cato Policy Report, 1996

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William A. Foster on accidents, achievement, choice, direction, effort, execution, experience, idealism, intelligence, intention, necessity, quality, satisfaction, sincerity, and usefulness

Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives, the cumulative experience of many masters of craftsmanship. Quality also marks the search for an ideal after necessity has been satisfied and mere usefulness achieved.

William A. Foster

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walt Whitman on accidents, animals, balance, hunger, and ridicule

O to be self-balanced for contingencies, To confront night, storms, hunger, ridicule, accidents, rebuffs as the trees and the animals do.

Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

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