acceptance

A Quote by C. Smith Sumner on acceptance, change, choice, competition, direction, eternity, and time

To be true, I must fully accept that at this moment, I can only be what I am . . . no more, no less; however, with the inevitable passing of each moment of time, I will gradually, but surely change . . . to become more or less, better or worse, stronger or weaker. My choice is the direction of change: it is mine alone. The only true competition is this rivalry with my changing self. It is the very basis of the grand eternal plan.

C. Smith Sumner (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on acceptance, authority, buddhism, conceit, desires, justice, pleasure, respect, solitude, thinking, fool, wise, and monk

One may desire a spurious respect and precedence among one's fellow monks, and the veneration of outsiders. "Both monks and laity should think it was my doing. They should accept my authority in all matters great or small." This is a fool's way of thinking. His self-seeking and conceit just increase. One way leads to acquisition, the other leads to nirvana. Realizing this a monk, as a disciple of the Buddha, should take no pleasure in the respect of others, but should devote himself to solitude.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: Sayings of the Buddha in The Dhammapada, p. 73-75

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on acceptance, awareness, buddhism, life, and mortality

To go from mortal to buddha, you have to put an end to karma, nurture your awareness, and accept what life brings.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 35

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, change, common sense, democracy, education, ignorance, insincerity, language, life, mathematics, meaning, needs, philosophy, physics, understanding, and words

The doctrine, as I understand it, consists in maintaining that the language of daily life, with words used in their ordinary meanings, suffices for philosophy, which has no need of technical terms or of changes in the significance of common terms. I find myself totally unable to accept this view. I object to it: 1.Because it is insincere; 2.Because it is capable of excusing ignorance of mathematics, physics and neurology in those who have had only a classical education; 3.Because it is advanced by some in a tone of unctuous rectitude, as if opposition to it were a sin against democracy; 4.Because it makes philosophy trivial; 5.Because it makes almost inevitable the perpetuation amongst philosophers of the muddle-headedness they have taken over from common sense.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory, Russell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, certainty, discovery, expectation, faith, kindness, knowledge, mathematics, people, religion, rest, security, teachers, thought, work, and world

I wanted certainty in the kind of way in which people want religious faith. I thought that certainty is more likely to be found in mathematics than elsewhere. But I discovered that many mathematical demonstrations, which my teachers expected me to accept, were full of fallacies, and that, if certainty were indeed discoverable in mathematics, it would be in a new field of mathematics, with more solid foundations than those that had hitherto been thought secure. But as the work proceeded, I was continually reminded of the fable about the elephant and the tortoise. having constructed an elephant upon which the mathematical world could rest, I found the elephant tottering, and proceeded to construct a tortoise to keep the elephant from falling. But the tortoise was no more secure than the elephant, and after some twenty years of very arduous toil, I came to the conclusion that there was nothing more that I could do in the way of making mathematical knowledge indubitable.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance and fear

Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on acceptance, desires, selfishness, value, and virtue

Why is it immoral for you to desire, but moral for others to do so? Why is it immoral to produce a value and keep it, but moral to give it away? And if it is not moral for you to keep a value, why is it moral for others to accept it? If you are selfless and virtuous when you give it, are they not selfish and vicious when they take it?

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: Atlas Shrugged, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on acceptance, joy, love, mind, necessity, pain, punishment, rebellion, secrets, songs, struggle, suffering, vision, work, and worth

It was his Fourth Concerto, the last work he had written. The crash of its opening chords swept the sights of the streets away from her mind. The Concerto was a great cry of rebellion. It was a 'NO' flung at some vast process of torture, a denial of suffering, a denial that held the agony of the struggle to break free. The sounds were like a voice saying: There is no necessity for pain - why, then, is the worst pain reserved for those who will not accept its necessity? - we who hold the love and the secret of joy, to what punishment have we been sentenced for it, and by whom? . . . The sounds of torture became defiance, the statement of agony became a hymn to a distant vision for whose sake anything was worth enduring, even this. It was the song of rebellion - and of a desperate quest.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 69)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on acceptance, existence, fighting, pain, soul, and suffering

It's not that I don't suffer, it's that I know the unimportance of suffering, I know that pain is to be fought and thrown aside, not to be accepted as part of one's soul and as a permanent scar across one's view of existence. Don't feel sorry for me. It was gone right then.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 883)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on acceptance, endurance, evil, goals, leadership, motives, murder, needs, power, sacrifice, satisfaction, suicide, support, survival, and virtue

Did you ask me to name man's motive power? Man's motive power is his moral code. Ask yourself where their code is leading you and what it offers you as your final goal. A viler evil than to murder a man, is to sell him suicide as an act of virtue. A viler evil than to throw a man into a sacrificial furnace, is to demand that he leap in, of his own will, and that he build the furnace, besides. By their own statement, it is they who need you and have nothing to offer you in return. By their own statement, you must support them because they cannot survive without you. Consider the obscenity of offering their impotence and their need - their need of you - as a justification for your torture. Are you willing to accept it? Do you care to purchase - at the price of your great endurance, at the price of your agony - the satisfaction of the needs of your own destroyers?

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 423-4)

Contributed by: Zaady

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