Winston Churchill

1874 - 1965

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on life

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The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on life

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We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on fighting

I like a man who grins when he fights.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on devil and hell

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If Hitler invaded hell, I would make at least a favourable reference to the devil in the House of Commons.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on facts and needs

I am certainly not one of those who need to be prodded. In fact, if anything, I am the prod.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: A Churchill Reader, edited by Colin Coote

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on conservatism, heart, and liberals

Any man who is under 30, and is not a liberal, has not heart; and any man who is over 30, and is not a conservative, has no brains.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill

When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Second World War: Moral of the Work, vol. III, The Grand Alliance, 1950

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on business, maxims, and people

The maxim of the British people is "Business as usual."

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on life, trouble, and worry

When I look back on all the worries I remember the story of the old man who said on his deathbed that he had a lot of trouble in his life, most of which never happened.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

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